Fencing Companyin North Charleston, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in North Charleston. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in North Charleston, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in North Charleston, SC

Roper Hospital Medical Campus coming to North Charleston

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – One of the Lowcountry’s leading hospitals is set to construct a new medical campus in the heart of North Charleston.Roper St. Francis Healthcare announced Wednesday it will invest $1 billion to build a new Roper Hospital Medical Campus at the site of the former North Charleston City Hall off Mall Drive.The campus will occupy 27 acres ne...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – One of the Lowcountry’s leading hospitals is set to construct a new medical campus in the heart of North Charleston.

Roper St. Francis Healthcare announced Wednesday it will invest $1 billion to build a new Roper Hospital Medical Campus at the site of the former North Charleston City Hall off Mall Drive.

The campus will occupy 27 acres near I-26 and I-526 which leaders say will make the hospital and its services easily accessible for patients who live in Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties.

Roper announced in November 2021 that it planned to move off the Charleston peninsula, a move they said would allow patients to “easily access care closer to where they live and work.”

North Charleston’s Finance Committee voted in favor of selling the former city hall building to Roper Hospital on Tuesday evening. City Council then approved the sale in a brief meeting afterward.

“It was a deal we are all proud of. The hospital is something we need. It’s going to bring thousands of jobs. They’re moving the whole campus to North Charleston and that’s a good thing,” said Mayor Pro Tem and City Councilman Jerome Heyward.

“This new medical campus will be a paradigm for providing healthcare, whether that’s complex surgeries in a hospital or an annual checkup in an outpatient office,” said Dr. Jeffrey DiLisi, president and chief executive officer of Roper St. Francis Healthcare. “We made the bold decision one year ago to move Roper Hospital, and I’m grateful to our North Charleston partners for breathing life into this dream. This new campus will ensure our ability to continue delivering the quality care that’s been the hallmark of our brand for generations.”

Roper’s leaders say the new medical campus is expected to include a full-service acute care hospital with a 24-hour Emergency Room. It will also have a medical office building where myriad outpatient and specialty care will be offered.

“We welcome Roper St. Francis Healthcare to the North Charleston hub of economic development,” said North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey. “The new Roper Hospital Medical Campus is the next exciting chapter of this healthcare system’s 167-year legacy, and I am honored that the third largest city in South Carolina can host this tremendous benefit for our citizens.”

The new campus will be the fourth location for Roper Hospital since it opened downtown in 1856. Leaders say it will be technologically and structurally upgraded to better withstand natural disasters, such as floods, hurricanes and earthquakes.

Construction is likely to take up to five years. Important services will continue to be offered on the peninsula to “remain convenient to those in need downtown.”

North Charleston to sell old City Hall building to Roper for hospital relocation

NORTH CHARLESTON — The city of North Charleston plans to sell its old City Hall building to Roper St. Francis Healthcare for around $10 million, a final step needed for the company to relocate its downtown hospital to the state’s third-largest municipality, sources close to the negotiations told The Post and Courier.North Charleston will hold a Finance Committee meeting at 5 p.m. Nov. 15 at the current City Hall on Mall Drive, where City Council members are expected to vote in favor of the decision to sell to Roper Hospita...

NORTH CHARLESTON — The city of North Charleston plans to sell its old City Hall building to Roper St. Francis Healthcare for around $10 million, a final step needed for the company to relocate its downtown hospital to the state’s third-largest municipality, sources close to the negotiations told The Post and Courier.

North Charleston will hold a Finance Committee meeting at 5 p.m. Nov. 15 at the current City Hall on Mall Drive, where City Council members are expected to vote in favor of the decision to sell to Roper Hospital the city’s former municipal building, located nearby at 4900 Lacross Road, the sources confirmed.

The full City Council will meet following the committee meeting to finalize the sale.

Roper is expected to make a formal announcement at 10 a.m. Nov. 16 across the street at the old Verizon Wireless call center, which Roper purchased in April, about its plans to build a hospital in North Charleston, sources confirmed.

This major development comes a year after Roper announced that it would relocate its flagship site from downtown Charleston after having provided medical services to patients on the peninsula for more than 165 years. Roper said at the time it had to move its Calhoun Street building because it needs an operation that can better handle flooding, hurricanes and earthquakes.

Roper’s downtown building is located in the flood-prone medical district on Calhoun Street between Jonathan Lucas Street and Courtenay Drive, an area that has repeatedly seen tidal events and heavy rainstorms. Additionally, Charleston is also located near a major East Coast fault line, though it has not been hit with a significant earthquake in more than 100 years.

Roper has purchased several properties near the old North Charleston City Hall building, fueling speculation about the hospital’s new home. In April, Roper bought the old Verizon call center for $22 million and an old corporate office building on Lacross Road for $5.5 million. In May, the hospital bought two more lots off Lacross Road for $13 million a piece.

In 2009, North Charleston’s government moved to a new City Hall just across Mall Drive from its old site. The city maintained ownership of the old building, leasing it tenants. Most recently, the space was occupied by Amazon.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

All-female muralist group painting across the Lowcountry

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- A cold wind blowing through cloudy skies on Rivers Avenue doesn’t stop Allison Dunavant’s day at work.The Lowcountry muralist is painting the side of an historic building in North Charleston and needs to finish before a tropical storm comes through.She spends most of her day on a boom lift, with her co-worker Christine Crawford, painting what will be a parrot taking flight and a woman surrounded by leaves of different colors.“This is a very community based piece,” sa...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- A cold wind blowing through cloudy skies on Rivers Avenue doesn’t stop Allison Dunavant’s day at work.

The Lowcountry muralist is painting the side of an historic building in North Charleston and needs to finish before a tropical storm comes through.

She spends most of her day on a boom lift, with her co-worker Christine Crawford, painting what will be a parrot taking flight and a woman surrounded by leaves of different colors.

“This is a very community based piece,” said Dunavant. “We wanted to bring some color to this area and have something that the residents can really be proud of.”

But, having a slab of brick or concrete as her office for days on end was not Dunavant’s original plan even though a paint brush has always been her best friend.

“I always loved doing portraits,” said Dunavant.

After graduating from college, Dunavant decided that she wanted to teach art at a university.

“I started doing that and didn’t like it. I went into banking and insurance,” said Dunavant.

One dead end became two.

“I was miserable. I would always sit at my desk and look out the window and want to be outside,” said Dunavant. “I randomly quit my job during my lunch break and decided that I wanted to be self employed. It was kind of terrifying to make that decision.”

Alli began painting murals among smaller forms of art, but she wasn’t making large scale projects her full time job until the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Now would be a great time to start growing bigger,” said Dunavant. “It’s taken off with word of mouth and referrals. It’s been quite a learning process going from painting small to painting large.”

Dunavant has painted murals at Low Tide Brewing, The Medical University of South Carolina, Red’s Ice House, Saltwater Cowboys and an Airbnb in Park Circle among other projects.

“A lot of times I’m in shock that this is what I get to do everyday, that this is my actual job. We’re doing at least a mural per week. That there’s a demand for it is amazing,” said Dunavant. “Every time that you’re out painting it’s a very public thing. People are coming up and talking to you. You’re getting to know different people.”

Dunavant’s brush strokes have been noticed by many, but the most important connection has been with Crawford over Instagram. Their joint business venture, ‘Girls Who Paint Murals,’ was formed shortly after they met.

“We’ve painted over 50 murals so far in a year’s span,” said Crawford. “We’re just a team of muralists. We travel all over. It kind of comes naturally to us and I think that’s why we work so well together.”

The two women are also trailblazers in their field.

“I think it’s a very male dominated business and that’s where I think we stand out,” said Crawford. “I think having to operate boom lifts or scissor lifts and climbing on ladders you have to have a lot of stamina for that.”

“We’re on construction sites. We’re on equipment. We’re going in paint stores. We’re up on ladders,” said Dunavant. “We’re basically like contractors as well.”

The group wants to break down the stigma of women getting intimidated by the male dominated industry. They see every mural as a sign to women that they can follow their artistic dreams.

“I’m so happy when I see a female artist come through,” said Crawford. “If you don’t take a risk then what is life? Even if you fail it’s a learning curve of getting back up and going again.”

“No matter what the medium is I think women should recognize that it’s something they can do full time,” said Dunavant.

As the sun peaks out over the Lowcountry and the mural’s finishing touches are painted on, both women take a moment to admire their work that could inspire the next artist.

“Finally seeing (a mural) some to fruition is like Christmas morning. You get very excited and then you start thinking about what can I do next,” said Dunavant.

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New North Charleston pedestrian bridge connects Riverfront Park

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – After two years of construction, the Noisette Creek Pedestrian Bridge is now complete, and Wednesday, a ceremony was held to officially open the bridge.Connecting the past to the present.“We had a golf course that was on both sides when the Navy was here and we took that away to make a park for the public,” North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey said. “This is an extension of that park on this side of the river, but we had no way to access it unless you went out on the road.&...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – After two years of construction, the Noisette Creek Pedestrian Bridge is now complete, and Wednesday, a ceremony was held to officially open the bridge.

Connecting the past to the present.

“We had a golf course that was on both sides when the Navy was here and we took that away to make a park for the public,” North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey said. “This is an extension of that park on this side of the river, but we had no way to access it unless you went out on the road.”

In 2020, North Charleston leadership wanted to build a bridge that connects Riverfront Park with the north side of Noisette Creek, but not just any bridge.

“We came up with the idea let’s build a bridge that’s unlike any other bridge in the word,” Summey said.

Two years later, that’s exactly what they’ve done.

“This bridge has been ranked the number six bridge in the world for pedestrian walking,” Summey said, “and that’s quite an accomplishment, so we’re proud to be able to have that.”

The 230-foot bridge that has two 55-foot-tall steel arches is special for many reasons, including the one person who was instrumental in making the project come to fruition.

“Ray Anderson,” Summey said, “who worked with me and passed away about six, seven weeks ago, had most to do of anybody in the city on this project. He was out here all the time and then come back to report to me.”

Anderson served as Mayor Summey’s special assistant for 27 years and he will soon be honored for his commitment to ensuring the bridge was complete.

“Later we will come back out and name the bridge after Ray Anderson,” Summey said.

Now that the bridge has connected the past to the present, Mayor Summey says this new structure is the start of a bright future for North Charleston.

“We’re going to create a community,” he said, “a whole community, on this base from the commercial node or the industrial node, all the way down through until we get back to Park Circle. Eventually, we’ll see high-rises, hotels, apartment complexes and businesses located on this track.”

Bosch investing $260M in North Charleston expansion

Bosch Charleston started producing electric motors this month. But the company needs more space and more people.So Bosch announced today that it will invest more than $260 million to further expand production of electrification products at the North Charleston facility, which the company calls Bosch Charleston, an investment that will ...

Bosch Charleston started producing electric motors this month. But the company needs more space and more people.

So Bosch announced today that it will invest more than $260 million to further expand production of electrification products at the North Charleston facility, which the company calls Bosch Charleston, an investment that will add 75,000 square feet and 350 new jobs to the site by 2025.

“We have grown our electrification business globally and here in the North American region,” said Mike Mansuetti, president of Bosch in North America. “We’ve invested more than $6 billion in electromobility development and in 2021 our global orders for electromobility surpassed $10 billion for the first time. Local production helps to advance our customers’ regional electrification strategies, and further supports the market demand for electrification.”

The company already dedicated about 200,000 square feet of an existing building on the Bosch Charleston campus to electromobility. The new assembly area includes the production of rotors and stators, and the final assembly of the electric motor.

The company also said it has secured additional electromobility business that makes the expansion necessary. The expansion is expected to be operational by the end of 2023.

The Bosch site in North Charleston Charleston supports multiple products from the Bosch Mobility Solutions portfolio, according to the news release. The site produces high-pressure fuel injectors and pumps for internal combustion engines. It also manufactures safety-related products.

The Bosch Charleston facility, which opened in 1974, is the largest manufacturing site in the United States for Bosch from an employment perspective with around 1,500 associates. It covers more than 900,000 square feet of floor space on 118 acres.

The electric motor production space is in a building formerly occupied by diesel components production. Bosch announced in January 2020 that production of diesel powertrain components would be slowly ramped down. The company indicated then it would pursue electrification business.

“This launch delivers on a commitment to our associates and to the local community in Charleston,” said Mansuetti, who started his Bosch career as a manufacturing engineer at the Charleston facility. “We are in the midst of major shifts in mobility, and the story of reinvention in Charleston is a model for how electrification production can evolve from within an existing facility. We are building on the long-standing expertise and commitment of the Charleston team with this new production.”

In August Mansuetti also delivered future-leaning news to the Anderson plant he once managed, where the company will invest more than $200 million and hire 350 workers to produce fuel cell stacks to be used in hydrogen-powered trucks.

As part of the Charleston site transformation, called Bosch Charleston, the company has provided reskilling and upskilling opportunities to employees to prepare for the production of electric motors. Those opportunities include travelling to other sites within the global Bosch production network for training and best practice sharing, according to a news release.

Bosch is also collaborating with local schools to begin implementing fundamentals related to electrification into curriculum. The Bosch Community Fund, the corporate foundation for Bosch in North America, has invested more than $2.5 million in grants related to STEM education efforts in the Charleston area since 2013, the release said.

As its orders in electromobility continue to increase, the Bosch global production network has been ramping up to support the expanding demand for electrification. Local-for-local production supports a robust supply chain approach for local customer needs.

“We have long been believers in the potential of electromobility and we have been investing heavily to bring this technology to market at scale for our customers,” Mansuetti said in the release.

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