Fencing Companyin St. George, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in St. George. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in St. George, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in St. George, SC

Comic Kevin James Hitches More Dates to ‘Irregardless Tour’

Kevin can’t wait to get on the road.Former King of Queens funnyman Kevin James launches his ‘Irregardless Tour’ February 1 at the Carpenter Theater in Richmond, VA . The tour will hit more than 30 cities before including two shows at Boston’s Wilbur Theater June 10 and 11. Shows in Raleigh, NC; Huntington, NY; Morristown, NJ; and Gary, IN were announced this week. See the full routing below.Tickets for the newly announced dates go on-sale January 13 at 10 a.m. local time.Among James&rsquo...

Kevin can’t wait to get on the road.

Former King of Queens funnyman Kevin James launches his ‘Irregardless Tour’ February 1 at the Carpenter Theater in Richmond, VA . The tour will hit more than 30 cities before including two shows at Boston’s Wilbur Theater June 10 and 11. Shows in Raleigh, NC; Huntington, NY; Morristown, NJ; and Gary, IN were announced this week. See the full routing below.

Tickets for the newly announced dates go on-sale January 13 at 10 a.m. local time.

Among James’ most recent shows is a two-performance play at Worcester, MA’s Hanover Theater November 11 and 12, grossing a total of $235,693 on 3,970 tickets over both performances, an average price of $59, according to reports submitted to Pollstar Boxoffice.

Kevin James Irregardless Tour

Feb. 1—Richmond, VA—Carpenter TheatreFeb. 2—Asheville, NC—Thomas Wolfe AuditoriumFeb. 3—Knoxville, TN—Tennessee TheatreFeb. 4—North Charleston, SC—North Charleston Performing Arts CenterFeb. 5—Jacksonville, FL—Florida TheatreFeb. 8—Tampa, FL—Seminole Hard Rock Tampa Event CenterFeb. 9—Hollywood, FL—Hard Rock Live at SeminoleFeb. 10—Ft. Myers, FL—Barbara B. Mann HallFeb. 11—Columbia, SC—Township AuditoriumFeb. 28—Munhall, PA—Carnegie Library of HomesteadMar. 2—Prior Lake, MN—Mystic Lake Casino HotelMar. 3—Harris, MI—Island Resort & CasinoMar. 5—Detroit, MI—The FillmoreMar. 19—Huntington, NY—The ParamountMar. 22—Boise, ID—Morrison CenterMar. 23—Eugene, OR—Silva Concert HallMar. 24—Seattle, WA—Paramount TheatreMar. 25—Bellingham, WA—Mount Baker TheatreMar. 26—Spokane, WA—Martin Woldson Theater at the FoxMar. 30—Santa Rosa, CA—Luther Burbank Center for the ArtsMar. 31—Lincoln, CA—The Venue at Thunder Valley CasinoApr. 1—Rancho Mirage, CA—The Show at Agua Caliente CasinoApr. 2—Temecula, CA—Pechanga TheaterApr. 15—Staten Island, NY—St. George TheatreMay 6*—York, PA—Strand TheatreMay 7—Raleigh, NC—Duke Center for the Performing ArtsMay 19—Morristown, NJ—Mayo Performing Arts CenterMay 21—Chester, NY—Sugar Loaf Performing Arts CenterJune 3*—Red Bank, NJ—Hackensack Meridian Health TheatreJune 4—Huntington, NY—The ParamountJune 9 Mashantucket, CT Premier Theater at FoxwoodsJune 10—Boston, MA—The WilburJune 11—Boston, MA—The WilburJune 18—Gary, IN—Hard Rock Live Northern Indiana

*— Two shows

VIVA Chicken Launched In Charlotte And Keeps Expanding

You’d expect VIVA Chicken, a fast-casual Peruvian chicken chain, to be based in an urban center with a large Latino population such as Miami, or maybe Los Angeles or New York, but not Charlotte, N.C. But you’d be mistaken since VIVA Chicken launched in Charlotte, whose Latino population is about 10%.Co-founder Bruno Machiavello, a native of Peru, arrived in Charlotte because his brother resided there, and Machiavello got a job as a chef in 1985 at George Couchell’s Showmars, a fast-causal fried chicken eatery. Couche...

You’d expect VIVA Chicken, a fast-casual Peruvian chicken chain, to be based in an urban center with a large Latino population such as Miami, or maybe Los Angeles or New York, but not Charlotte, N.C. But you’d be mistaken since VIVA Chicken launched in Charlotte, whose Latino population is about 10%.

Co-founder Bruno Machiavello, a native of Peru, arrived in Charlotte because his brother resided there, and Machiavello got a job as a chef in 1985 at George Couchell’s Showmars, a fast-causal fried chicken eatery. Couchell took Machiavello under his wing, showed him how to lead a restaurant team and prepare outstanding food.

Machiavello and partner Randy Garcia launched VIVA Chicken in Charlotte in 2013, taking out a $150,000 loan from Garcia’s father to capitalize it. It did so well that they repaid it in six months. Both are still involved in running the restaurants.

Since then, it has expanded to 16 restaurants in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Utah. All are company-owned; none is franchised.

A Peruvian fast-casual chicken chain, VIVA Chicken, has found a private equity partner that prefers slow-growth and has expanded into four states, with more to come.

Asked what the secret is to the success of the growth of VIVA Chicken, Machiavello replied, “It’s the passion we have for the food and service and our amazing team of great people. Everyone helps each other, from the office, to the kitchen, to the dining room.”

And they named it VIVA Chicken, Machiavello said, because VIVA in Spanish means “feeling happy and celebrating.” And they capitalized the letters for emphasis.

Machiavello obtained initial funding to open his second VIVA Chicken from Charlotte restaurateur Dennis Thompson. Then he formed a small investment group to open up a few more locations. In 2017 Main Post Partners, a private equity firm, entered and helped subsidize future outposts.

Savannah Davis, VIVA Chicken’s marketing and innovation director, said it chose to align with Main Post Partners because, unlike most private equity firms, “they don’t see quick return as their main priority. They understand VIVA Chicken’s concept, and they see the long game.”

Moreover, she added their role is to “help us understand the best business practices to make us successful.”

Machiavello describes his signature dish as Polla a la Brasa, which is based on his special spice mixture and preparation. It’s unique because of the “way it’s cooked in a rotisserie oven and the marination process,” he noted.

But it offers more than Peruvian chicken. It also sells wraps, salads, soups, gluten-free and vegetarian options and is known for its Peruvian street food, Peruvian fried rice and tacu bowls.

One of his main missions when opening VIVA Chicken, he said, was “educating consumers on Peruvian cuisine. It still, to this day, is not as common as other international options so finding that line between authentic yet approachable is where we try to position VIVA.”

To reach out to its audience, it offers free samples to new customers. “After they taste it, they fall in love with it,” exuded Machiavello.

Pre-covid, its business was about 49% dine-in and 51% to go, but currently it’s 29% dine-in and 71% to go, so it’s become mostly a take-out spot.

To adjust to increased off-premises business, Savannah Davis said it had to “pivot and put more resources and labor into take-out orders.” About 17% of its business derives from a variety of third-party deliverers.

Expansion is on the horizon. It intends to open a second Georgia eatery in Alpharetta in 2023, and plans on expanding by three to five new locations per year.

Asked whether franchising, often the fastest way to capitalize and expand a restaurant chain, was on the horizon, Davis replied that it wants to firmly establish all of its processes and protocols, before it considers franchising. “It’s not something we discuss, but for any restaurant that has multiple locations, franchising is an opportunity,” she said.

Asked what the keys are to the future success of VIVA Chicken, Machiavello replied, “Keep doing what we’re doing: serving the freshest food we have. And keep doing it with passion.”

11 big business ‘nepotism babies’ born into privilege: from Samsung Electronics chair Jay Y. Lee and FedEx heir Richard Smith, to Donald Trump’s sons Donald Jr. and Eric and LVMH’s Delphine Arnault

As the saying goes, it’s not what you know, but who you know. That’s all the more true for “nepo baby” executives who have bagged high-powered jobs at their family businesses.The term nepo baby – short for nepotism baby – entered popular use last month after New York magazine took a deep dive into ...

As the saying goes, it’s not what you know, but who you know. That’s all the more true for “nepo baby” executives who have bagged high-powered jobs at their family businesses.

The term nepo baby – short for nepotism baby – entered popular use last month after New York magazine took a deep dive into the world of Hollywood nepotism. The front cover of the magazine’s December issue used the term while featuring eight Hollywood celebrities in onesies with the headline, “She has her mother’s eyes. And her agent”.

Now it’s our turn. Here’s our list of 12 nepo babies from the world of big business – high-flying executives whose family ties have given them a leg up the corporate ladder. Not all of them had even always wanted to work in the family business, but most gained a wealth of experience from relatively early ages in their parents’ companies and industries.

Donald Trump Jr., 45, and Eric Trump, 39, the eldest sons of former President Donald Trump, together run the Trump Organization as its executive vice-presidents.

Donald Trump Jr. has helped run the family business by overseeing building projects including Trump Park Avenue, 40 Wall Street, and Trump International Hotel and Tower.

In an interview in 2019, he ironically appeared to accuse Joe Biden’s son Hunter of benefiting from nepotism. He said Hunter had business dealings in countries outside the US only because “they’re really buying favour with the father”, adding: “When you’re the father and your son’s entire career is dependent on that, they own you.”

Eric Trump, who appeared on 23 episodes of , is said to have helped grow the family’s portfolio of properties.

Ivanka Trump, 41, the eldest daughter of the former president, joined the Trump Organization in 2005 as an executive vice-president. She moved away from the company after being appointed as a senior White House adviser in 2017, when her father took his seat in the Oval Office.

While president, the elder Trump tweeted that he liked the idea of Ivanka becoming US ambassador to the United Nations – but that he could “already hear the chants of nepotism”.

Lachlan Murdoch, 51, is the eldest son of the media tycoon Rupert Murdoch.

He was born in London, raised in New York and began working for his father’s News Corporation at age 18 at one of the company’s Australian newspapers.

After graduating from Princeton, he rose up the ranks at News Corp but resigned in 2005 to pursue his own business ventures, largely in Australia. He returned to the family fold in 2014 when Rupert promoted him to co-chair of News Corp to oversee operations at Fox News, the New York Post and The Wall Street Journal.

The following year, he was appointed executive chair of 21st Century Fox, which Disney bought in 2019. He then became CEO and chair of Fox Corporation, which holds legacy 21st Century Fox assets including Fox News and the Fox television network.

He’s also the executive chair of Nova Entertainment, which owns radio stations in Australia. Rupert’s son James and daughter Elisabeth have also been involved in the family business, but they haven’t risen as high as Lachlan.

It’s widely believed that the Murdochs inspired the fictional Roy family in the HBO drama .

Delphine Arnault is the daughter of Bernard Arnault, who recently overtook Elon Musk as the world’s richest person, with a fortune valued by Bloomberg at US$175 billion.

The elder Arnault is the CEO and chair of the French luxury fashion and goods giant LVMH.

Delphine joined Christian Dior, an LVMH subsidiary, in 2001. In 2013, she became an executive vice-president at Louis Vuitton, another subsidiary.

She received her first Louis Vuitton bag when she was 18.

The 47-year-old was appointed to the board and became executive vice-president at Louis Vuitton in 2013 and has been on the company’s executive committee since 2019.

All five of Bernard’s children work for LVMH or one of its brands, but Delphine, like Lachlan Murdoch, has risen higher in the family business than her siblings.

Her brother Antoine was appointed CEO of Christian Dior and vice-chairman of its board in December. Antoine became a board member at LVMH in 2006.

Alexandre Arnault is an executive vice-president at Tiffany & Co.; Frédéric Arnault serves as the CEO of Tag Heuer; and the youngest of the five siblings, Jean Arnault, is the director of watches development and marketing at Louis Vuitton.

David Lauren is the youngest son of the fashion mogul Ralph Lauren. He’s the chief brand and innovation officer at his father’s namesake company.

“I never wanted to work for my father,” he told Time magazine in 2002, two years after he joined Ralph Lauren. He was credited with helping to expand the company’s online presence when launching its website.

In 2013, David was appointed to the board of Ralph Lauren, and he became vice-chairman three years later.

The 51-year-old studied political science at Duke University and is married to Lauren Bush, the granddaughter of George H.W. Bush.

In 2014, Abigail Johnson took over from her father, Edward Johnson III, as CEO of Fidelity Investments. She has chaired the company since 2016.

Fidelity was founded by Edward Johnson II, her grandfather, in 1949.

Abigail spent summer university breaks working at Fidelity before joining the company full time in 1988 as an analyst.

Forbes estimates that at Johnson, 61, is worth US$21 billion, making her the world’s 75th richest person. The Johnson family owns about half the company.

Jay Y. Lee, 54, became the executive chair of Samsung Electronics in October 2022. His father, Lee Kun-hee, held the same role until his passing in October 2020.

Jay was jailed for a year in 2017 after being charged with bribing a close associate of a former South Korean president. He was sentenced in 2021 to two and a half years in prison after a retrial and was out on parole, but he was pardoned in August by South Korea’s president. As a result, the five-year ban on Lee taking up a post at Samsung was lifted.

He was second on Forbes’ list of Korea’s 50 richest people in 2022, with an estimated net worth of US$9.2 billion.

Arthur Gregg “A.G.” Sulzberger, 42, is chair of The New York Times Company – the fourth member of the Sulzberger family to hold that role.

The family has run the Times for more than a century. A.G. became publisher of The New York Times in 2018 and took over as chairman of the newspaper’s holding company from his father, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., three years later.

Shari Redstone is the daughter of Sumner Redstone, who took control of Viacom in 1987 and turned the company into a TV and film empire that included CBS, Paramount Pictures, MTV, Nickelodeon and Comedy Central.

Today, Shari, 68, chairs Paramount Global, which was formed in 2019 by the US$12 billion merger of Viacom and CBS, which themselves were demerged in 2006.

Sumner was executive chair of both Viacom and CBS until he resigned from both roles in 2016 at the age of 92.

Shari and Sumner publicly feuded in 2007 over the future of National Amusements, the theatre chain founded by her grandfather.

Shari once vowed “the one thing I was determined to do was never work in the family business”, but nevertheless she went on to become executive vice-president of National Amusements in her 40s.

The Redstones are said to have partly inspired the HBO drama .

In 2022, Gus Wenner became CEO of Rolling Stone, the magazine co-founded by his father, Jann.

A 23-year-old Gus joined Wenner Media, his father’s publishing business, in 2013, after attending Brown University. He joined after his father asked him over lunch whether he wanted to run the magazine’s website, and he ultimately took the role of head of digital for Rolling Stone, Us Weekly and Men’s Journal. His age isn’t publicly broadcasted, but he’s estimated to be in his early 30s.

When Penske Media bought Rolling Stone in 2017, Gus became president and chief operating officer of the title.

He formed the musical act Gus and Scout while studying at Brown with Scout LaRue Willis, the daughter of Bruce Willis and Demi Moore.

John R. Tyson, 35, is the CFO and executive vice-president of Tyson Foods and is the fourth generation of the Tyson family to work in the family business.

He was arrested and charged with public intoxication in November 2022, after being accused of trespassing in the home of a woman he didn’t know. He told the company’s investors he was “embarrassed” about the incident and took “full responsibility”.

His father, John H. Tyson, has been chairman of Tyson Foods since 1998, and served as CEO from 2000 to 2006.

FedEx was founded in 1971 by the entrepreneur Frederick Smith. Frederick’s son Richard joined the company in 2005 as a senior solutions analyst and became a manager two years later.

Richard Smith (who’s 44 or 45) became CEO of FedEx Express, the company’s largest division, in September 2022. At the time of his appointment, the Barclays analyst Brandon Oglenski said: “We’re not screaming nepotism, but one could come to that conclusion. It’s not a good look for Richard because he just doesn’t have the experience that prior Express leaders did.”

Richard has spent 17 years at the company in various roles. He previously served as Americas regional president and executive president of global support at FedEx Express.

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Commentary: Developer: Newest 295 Calhoun plan meets requirements, will enhance Charleston

On Wednesday, we will submit the fourth and what we hope will be our final request for approval of our 295 Calhoun St. mixed-use development to the Charleston Board of Architectural Review.More than four years ago, we made a commitment to the Medical University of South Carolina and the city of Charleston that we would construct a mixed-use community of the highest quality to serve the citizens of Charleston as well as the staff and student population of the university. Since that time, we have made more than 40 significant changes to...

On Wednesday, we will submit the fourth and what we hope will be our final request for approval of our 295 Calhoun St. mixed-use development to the Charleston Board of Architectural Review.

More than four years ago, we made a commitment to the Medical University of South Carolina and the city of Charleston that we would construct a mixed-use community of the highest quality to serve the citizens of Charleston as well as the staff and student population of the university. Since that time, we have made more than 40 significant changes to our plans based on the feedback we sought and received from the BAR, a Charleston-based architectural firm, the city’s architectural division, MUSC, nearby neighborhood associations and the greater Charleston community. These changes include, but are not limited to, reducing the height by one story and reducing the mass by more than 30,000 square feet.

Due to their insightful commentary and willingness to provide constructive input during the development of our plans, we were able to produce plans that are fully compliant with all zoning requirements and received recommendations for approval from the city’s architectural department, MUSC and the two neighborhood associations most impacted by our project and Mason Preparatory School. Now, with the incorporation of additional changes requested by the BAR, we believe we have designed a community that is not only aesthetically pleasing and a great architectural fit within the skyline in the Calhoun Street area, but one that will be very inviting to pedestrians, thereby activating this area of Charleston and making a significant positive impact in the community.

Recent columns denouncing our development have suggested that it doesn’t warrant BAR approval because, among other reasons, Southeastern does not have sufficient connections to or investment in the Charleston community. Contrary to these assertions, our company has been actively building and developing in the Charleston area for almost 40 years, and our family has maintained a home in Charleston for more than 45 years. In fact, our family’s love and respect for Charleston extends back more than 230 years to our ancestor, the Rev. George Buist, who was minister of the 1st (Scots) Presbyterian Church and president of the College of Charleston.

Southeastern continues to actively develop in the Charleston area and has played an active role in some of Charleston‘s largest and most successful developments. More than 20 years ago we acquired almost 6,000 acres in West Ashley known as Poplar Grove. This development now has more than 300 homes and is recognized as one of the area’s most successful and attractive communities. In addition to developing this high-quality conservation-focused community, we worked with Ducks Unlimited, Dorchester County and various nonprofit organizations to place more than 3,200 acres under a perpetual conservation easement, thereby reducing the maximum allowable homes from more than 3,500 to only 50.

More than 15 years ago we had the pleasure of working with MeadWestvaco in conceptualizing the Nexton community. We developed the two initial hotel properties, the Marriott Courtyard and the Marriott Residence Inn. The Courtyard was named the No. 1 Marriott Courtyard worldwide in 2016. More recently on the peninsula, we developed and continue to own and operate the Hilton Garden Inn hotel on Lockwood Drive located mere blocks away from 295 Calhoun St.

We have also developed various retail and restaurant properties throughout the area, including the Royal Tern on Johns Island in 2018, and have plans for at least two more affiliated restaurants in the near future.

As demonstrated by these projects, we are a company that takes pride in all the properties we develop, especially irreplaceable properties we plan to own forever such as the one located at 295 Calhoun St.

We have now worked for more than four years trying to develop our property. Our zoning was unanimously approved by the planning and zoning committee as well as Charleston City Council.

Recent articles stating that we have filed suit against the city of Charleston are misleading. We merely appealed our most recent BAR denial as required by city ordinances. In our history of more than 40 years we have never filed a significant lawsuit.

We are hopeful that the recent significant changes to our plans address the concerns of the BAR and the larger Charleston community. We are excited and grateful to be able to bring another great development to the Charleston community and hope the BAR will allow us to move forward with this development.

Victor J. Mills is CEO of Southeastern Real Estate Group, LLC.

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Charleston Museum to showcase 270-year-old dress as part of anniversary exhibit

Museumgoers in May will have the rare chance to view a 270-year-old pink silk gown — a crown jewel of The Charleston Museum’s expansive textile collection and a relic intimately connected to the city’s past and present.The robe à la française dress was worn around 1753 in England by Eliza Lucas Pinckney, a member of Charleston’s wealthy planter class.It was chosen as part of the 250th anniversary exhibition both because of its impressive condition and long-standing history linking its origi...

Museumgoers in May will have the rare chance to view a 270-year-old pink silk gown — a crown jewel of The Charleston Museum’s expansive textile collection and a relic intimately connected to the city’s past and present.

The robe à la française dress was worn around 1753 in England by Eliza Lucas Pinckney, a member of Charleston’s wealthy planter class.

It was chosen as part of the 250th anniversary exhibition both because of its impressive condition and long-standing history linking its original owner to Charleston and the museum’s early days, said Virginia Theerman, curator of historic textiles.

Pinckney was born in 1722 to Ann and George Lucas. She was tasked as a teen with managing three of her family’s plantations scattered around the Lowcountry, including Wappoo Plantation in what is now West Ashley.

Pinckney is largely credited with turning indigo into a cash crop for South Carolina in the 1740s. Under the guidance and expertise of the men and women she enslaved, Pinckney experimented with the tropical plant until she found success: enough indigo to begin mass-producing the blue dye, which was highly sought after in England’s growing textile market.

Records suggest Pinckney had the floral gown made during her family’s stint in England, ahead of her presentation to the Dowager Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, mother of the future King George III.

The dress remained in Pinckney’s family until it was donated to the museum in 1940. It was exhibited a few times, particularly before 1979, and underwent extensive conservation in 2016, Theerman said.

The gown collected dust, dirt and body oils, which decayed the fibers in the delicate silk fabric. An independent conservator repaired some of the splits and damages, with the goal of keeping her retouches to the garment invisible. She also gave the museum recommendations for future preservation.

The museum has always kept a collection of objects, including dress and fashion, she said. Records show the museum acquired one pair of boots in the early 1800s.

By the late 20th century, the museum amassed enough items to create a historic textiles collection, separate from the history collection, Theerman said. Today it spans more than 10,000 pieces.

Theerman began curating her part of the anniversary exhibition over two years ago, in summer 2020. She knew early on Pinckney’s damask-like silk dress would be a focal point.

The garment’s roots are buried deep within Charleston’s past and the museum’s 1773 beginnings. Pinckney’s eldest son, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, helped establish the institution’s first collection.

“To be able to show that gown and say, ‘This was around even before this museum came to be,’ is a really wonderful way to connect back to that history,” Theerman said.

And it reveals another important truth, one inseparable from the city’s own history: The Pinckneys had these “wonderful” items they could give to the museum because of their wealth, which was built on the backs of those they enslaved, Theerman said.

This inward-gazing, reflective spirit is the premise of the 250th celebration, with a nod to the future.

Viewing historical garments is a visceral experience, different from looking at art or an object, Theerman said. Textiles can bridge the gap between today’s museum visitors and the past. We can all imagine what it might feel like to don a silk-laden gown.

Pinckney wore the dress a long time ago — an estimated 269 years, to be exact. Was she nervous to step in front of the English court? Or did she select the colors — a vivid pink and cream — because they made her feel confident?

Pinckney, who stood around 5-foot-4, would’ve had the same self-conscious ideas about her body as we do today, Theerman said, the same kind of thoughts that run through our heads when we get dressed each morning.

“That can be really grounding,” she said.

The gown, along with a few of Pinckney’s personal items, will be on display May 13 through July 9. It will join some of the most interesting and storied pieces from the textile collection as part of the museum’s broader anniversary exhibition.

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