Fencing Companyin Cottageville, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in Cottageville. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in Cottageville, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in Cottageville, SC

Parents express concern over Colleton County Schools’ new bell schedule

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - Some Colleton County elementary schoolers will have to be at the bus stop as early as 6 a.m. starting this school year, and parents are not happy.The district just announced its new bell schedule within a month of the first day of school, and it is already receiving backlash, especially on Facebook.The schools affected by the new bell schedule are listed below:7:00 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.- Bells Elementary School- Cottageville Elementary School- Hendersonville Elementary School...

WALTERBORO, S.C. (WCSC) - Some Colleton County elementary schoolers will have to be at the bus stop as early as 6 a.m. starting this school year, and parents are not happy.

The district just announced its new bell schedule within a month of the first day of school, and it is already receiving backlash, especially on Facebook.

The schools affected by the new bell schedule are listed below:

7:00 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

- Bells Elementary School

- Cottageville Elementary School

- Hendersonville Elementary School

8:00 a.m. - 2:45 p.m.

- Northside Elementary School

- Forest Hills Elementary School

- Black Street Early Childhood Center

8:45 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

- Colleton County Middle School

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

- Colleton County High School

Most parents say they do not want their elementary schoolers starting so early and their high schoolers ending so late.

Kevin Canaday, a father of three kids in Colleton County School District, says this is causing issues for parents who rely on childcare services after school. He says it is creating 11–12-hour days for elementary schoolers.

“Elementary schools K-4, K-5, first graders, who are getting their foundations of education and having them start this early in the day, so they’re getting out of school if I remember correctly is 1:45,” Canaday said. “So, by the time they get home, there’s really not going to be anyone there to help them with homework or anything like that because they’re getting home so early.”

William Bowman Jr., the chairperson for Colleton County Schools, says this change came from a shortage of bus drivers. He says the district should have 65 drivers, but they are short 15 for this school year.

He says Dr. Vallerie Cave, Colleton County Schools’ Superintendent, did not want bus drivers to be making triple or quadruple routes to fill in for the missing drivers. He says if they did this, it would result in kids not arriving at school until 10 or 11:00 in the morning.

“We’re seeing a lot of growth in all of our core subject areas across all of our grade levels,” Bowman Jr. said. “So, we want to continue with that academic progress, and a big part of that continuation is making sure that our students receive the proper instruction. And if students are getting to school at 10 or 11:00 in the morning, they’re missing a huge part of instruction.”

Bowman says he encourages everyone to apply to be a bus driver for Colleton County School District.

There will also be a school board meeting on Tuesday, July 26 at 6 p.m., where the board will explain more of why they made these changes.

The South Carolina Department of Education recently launched the “Step Up SC” campaign, which highlights open bus driver and technician positions across the state.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Cottageville store plays host to History Channel’s ‘American Pickers’

COTTAGEVILLE — Cottageville will have a national audience with a segment about a local general store on “American Pickers” this weekend.The former Hunt’s General Store will be featured at 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8.Lawrence Otho Hunt opened a general store in the 1930s and his grandsons Brad and Bruce Hunt welcomed Mike and Robbie Wolfe of “American Pickers” to give them an opportunity to find antique treasures.“American Pickers” debuted in 2010 and is centered around Mark and...

COTTAGEVILLE — Cottageville will have a national audience with a segment about a local general store on “American Pickers” this weekend.

The former Hunt’s General Store will be featured at 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8.

Lawrence Otho Hunt opened a general store in the 1930s and his grandsons Brad and Bruce Hunt welcomed Mike and Robbie Wolfe of “American Pickers” to give them an opportunity to find antique treasures.

“American Pickers” debuted in 2010 and is centered around Mark and, at the time, Frank Fritz, who travel to junkyards and antique stores all over the country to find valuables and collectibles to buy and resale.

The Hunt brothers were always fans of the show and Brad said he and their mother Dorothy would watch it together over the years. Dorothy passed away last January and after Bruce and Brad acquired the old business, Brad decided to reach out to the show.

Hunt’s general store was operational in Cottageville from about the 1930s to 1989. Grandsons of the original owner and founder were on the “American Pickers” show which airs this weekend. The bottom photo is a house next door to the store. (Photo Provided)

“We have a lot of old stuff that I’ve seen them buy and I thought they’d like to look through (it). We watched the show a lot (and) it kind of felt like (we) knew them before they got there. They were very personable. They were there to work; they were cordial,” Brad Hunt said.

Cottageville was one of two stops in West Virginia, and Brad said the episode will delve into his family’s history and grandfather’s legacy.

“A lot of them are excited about telling the backstory; that’s a lot of the show on top of them buying and reselling stuff,” Brad Hunt said.

Lawrence “L.O.’s” store was a catch-all place that sold milk, groceries, hardware, guns, appliances and clothing. It was also a butcher shop.

“Those were common back then. There were not Walmarts, and every little community had its own little store that had everything,” Brad Hunt said.

L.O. ran the store until his passing in the ’90s, except when he was serving in World War II, during which time his brothers worked in his place. L.O. was a postmaster in the Navy and Cottageville, and his store was also the local post office at the time.

“He was the judge, jury and executioner; he kind of ran the town. He was a community servant,” Brad Hunt said.

Going forward, Brad says he and Bruce want to use the space as a man cave where they can store tools, work on projects and spend time together.

“We’re going to use a lot of the old stuff for decoration,” he said.

Mark Whitley, director of Jackson County Economic Development, said he’s looking forward to watching the episode since he’s a huge fan of the show.

“I never try to miss an episode and when they come into a community, it opens up our eyes to different parts of the country that we normally wouldn’t have the opportunity to see,” Whitley said. “Any kind of exposure we can get from this is going to be very beneficial.”

Whitley said Jackson County has a rich history and he’s grateful for the Hunt brothers’ work to be featured on the show.

“Jackson County residents have so many interesting treasures, I think they could spend quite a few days here and not even scratch the surface for the things that would be of interest to the national population,” he said.

When “American Pickers” features a piece of Jackson County history, Brad Hunt hopes people across the nation will learn something about the community’s culture.

“I wish my mother was still alive to be able to see it and participate. It was a fun experience and we hope everybody enjoys getting a little history lesson of the little town of Cottageville and our grandfather,” he said.

The show airs 9 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8, on the History Channel.

Candice Black can be reached at cblack@newsandsentinel.com.

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Picture this: Ready for Riverfest

Kayaking the Edisto River — South Carolina’s natural hidden treasure in the Lowcountry

“Hold still, little bird,” I muttered to myself as I squinted through the viewfinder of my camera. Despite my command, the bird refused to stay put on the branch as I tried to focus long enough to release the shutter. With a click I was the owner of yet another high-definition digital photo of … an empty tree branch.The object of my frustration on this day is a bright yellow prothonotary warbler, a migratory songbird that thrives in the flooded woodlands of the swampy rivers of the South Carolina Lowcountry....

“Hold still, little bird,” I muttered to myself as I squinted through the viewfinder of my camera. Despite my command, the bird refused to stay put on the branch as I tried to focus long enough to release the shutter. With a click I was the owner of yet another high-definition digital photo of … an empty tree branch.

The object of my frustration on this day is a bright yellow prothonotary warbler, a migratory songbird that thrives in the flooded woodlands of the swampy rivers of the South Carolina Lowcountry.

Wintering in South America, the prothonotary warbler can be found in spring and summer in the Carolinas where breeding pairs can be spotted in trees along the riverbank or deep in the swamp. Its song is a bright twee-twee-twee-twee and as it darts among the low branches above the black water of a swamp, it seems to almost demand a photo.

This spring morning, as I paddle a quiet stretch of the Edisto River, a warbler darts among the branches of a low willow hunting snails and insects. With its yellow colors flashing like a lightning bug in daytime, I am compelled to stop once again and fill the memory card on my camera with photos of tree branches in an obsession that seems to amuse the little bird. Finally, both of us are relieved as I obtain a photo or two and both of us depart satisfied from the encounter.

The subject of my photo lives with others of his kind along one of the most beautiful stretches of the Edisto River that you can ever see. The Edisto River is the longest river system contained entirely in South Carolina. Rising from Saluda and Edgefield counties, the Edisto corkscrews 250 miles along the Lowcountry to the sea and forms the “E” of the critical ACE Basin water system.

Artesian wells and crystal clear springs bubble from the limestone bedrock along the upper river and near the coast it becomes a rich, blackwater river where deep swamps open to salt marsh horizons. To spend time kayaking or boating along the Edisto is to experience a special paradise on earth.

This section of warbler-haunted Edisto described above runs approximately seven miles from Good Hope Landing to Sullivan’s Ferry near Cottageville. Good Hope Landing is a beautiful, easily accessible boat landing that allows you easy access to the river. Its 10-foot sandy bluff is crowned by a majestic live oak and the river here is wide and relatively straight.

As the current carries you along you can spot an abundance of wildlife. Egrets and herons wade in the shallows, songbirds (including prothonotary warblers) inhabit the trees and in the water, terrapin, gar and even the elusive alligator can be spotted. The river is filled with redbreast bream, catfish and bass — making this a popular as a destination for anglers.

A few miles downstream there is a narrow portion, where willows grow close and fallen trees can snag unwary boaters or those floating along in innertubes, a favorite summer pastime for hundreds of visitors every year. At four miles, you will pass Long Creek Landing, another serviceable launching location, and shortly after will pass beneath the highway bridge of U.S.-17A at the privately owned Jellico’s Landing.

Up to this point, the Edisto has been wild and scenic with few houses or other reminders of human habitation. From the bridge at Jellico’s, well-sited river houses and cottages line the river and form the community of Sullivan’s Landing. Dating from at least as far back as 1820, Sullivan’s was one of many such river crossings in the Lowcountry before bridges and modern highways took hold. The 1820 record of the South Carolina state legislature reveals that the toll for Sullivan’s Ferry was “for every two-horse carriage, 50 cents … horse and rider, 10 cents, and 5 cents for every foot passenger and head of horses, mules, cattle, sheep, goats and hogs …”

Recently, I kayaked from Good Hope to Sullivan’s Ferry with a group of friends and we found the old ferry site to be far quieter that it might have been in 1820. We enjoyed a beautiful spring day with the smooth Edisto reflecting the deep blue of a sky filled with lazy clouds. Recent rains had raised river levels and we enjoyed exploring side channels into coves of swampy flooded forest and hidden oxbow lakes.

After many hours leisurely exploring and encountering wildlife, we arrived at Sullivan’s Ferry for the journey home. We were all of the opinion that this section of the Edisto River was the most beautiful we had ever encountered — and I am certain that you will feel the same way. Should you chance to encounter a little yellow bird in a willow tree, I am certain he will share his opinion of the river, too.

Good Hope Landing and Sullivan’s Ferry Landing are both located near Cottageville and are only a little over an hour’s drive from the Beaufort area. To get there, take Interstate 95 or U.S.-17-A to Walterboro and stay on 17-A to Cottageville. In Cottageville, turn left onto Pierce Road. At 4 miles, turn right onto State Road S-15-35 to the dead end at Good Hope Landing. Sullivan’s Ferry is located at the end of Sullivan’s Ferry Road approximately 3 miles from Cottageville just off 17-A. Both landings are managed by the South Carolina DNR and are well-maintained. There are no facilities, so pack accordingly.

The river in this section is swift when the water is up but very easy to manage, despite a few areas of overhang and snags. Careful preparation and good company will ensure you have a safe, enjoyable day on the water.

For more information, visit the Edisto River Canoe and Kayak Trail site at https://ercktrail.org or obtain a detailed map at https://www.dnr.sc.gov/water/river/edisto-guide.html

School Resource Officers are coming back with Colleton kids

By Heather RuppeThis fall, students in all of Colleton County’s public schools will walk into classrooms with a buddy who helps to look out for them. This buddy, or mentor, is also known as a School Resource Officer (SRO).SRO’s are law enforcement officers employed with the Colleton County Sheriff’s Office. Each officer who chooses to become an SRO does receives special and additional training through the S.C. Criminal Justice Academy. This training allows them to work with children and to be leaders in local ...

By Heather Ruppe

This fall, students in all of Colleton County’s public schools will walk into classrooms with a buddy who helps to look out for them. This buddy, or mentor, is also known as a School Resource Officer (SRO).

SRO’s are law enforcement officers employed with the Colleton County Sheriff’s Office. Each officer who chooses to become an SRO does receives special and additional training through the S.C. Criminal Justice Academy. This training allows them to work with children and to be leaders in local schools.

After completing this additional training, each SRO in Colleton County is then assigned to a certain school. There, these officers work with their schools’ administration, helping teachers and school leaders to influence students in a positive way.

“These officers ensure the safety and well-being of our students and staff within our schools,” said Colleton County Sheriff Buddy Hill. “They play a critical role in our community’s safety and in the education of our students. We look forward to all that our officers will do this year to help our students and our communities thrive.”

School Resource Officers are trained by the sheriff’s office and are funded jointly, through the efforts of the sheriff’s office and the Colleton County School District.

This year, each school in Colleton County will have assigned SRO’s. Colleton County High School has two of these officers. This is because of the number of students who attend the school.

Colleton County School District Superintendent Dr. Vallerie Cave said she sets safety as a priority. “Through the support of the SRO partnership our students and families can be assured we put safety and well-being first. We appreciate the support of the Sheriff’s Department and look forward to a great school year,” she said.

These School Resource Officer assignments are:

Colleton County High School: Deputy Robin “Caroline” Chaplin and Deputy L. Cummings

Colleton County Middle School: Deputy Kyle Breland and Deputy Daniel Lopez

Hendersonville Elementary School: Cpl. Stencil White

Bells Elementary School: Cpl. Jimmy Wiggins

Cottageville Elementary School: Deputy Heidi Coleman

Northside Elementary School: Sgt. Shannon Thomason

Forest Hills Elementary School: Lt. Ricky Valentine

Black Street Elementary School: Cpl. Chad Cummings

Other items that may interest you

CCSD Robotics hosted competition

Colleton County School District hosted a FIRST LEGO League East Qualifier robotics competition Saturday, February 12 at Colleton County Middle School (CCMS) to decide which team will go to State.Nearly 25 teams from all over the South Carolina came to showcase their robotic creations and have their work judged. Eleven teams from Colleton were on hand to compete and demonstrate their STEM and robotic invention.STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, basic knowledge needed in today’s fast paced wo...

Colleton County School District hosted a FIRST LEGO League East Qualifier robotics competition Saturday, February 12 at Colleton County Middle School (CCMS) to decide which team will go to State.

Nearly 25 teams from all over the South Carolina came to showcase their robotic creations and have their work judged. Eleven teams from Colleton were on hand to compete and demonstrate their STEM and robotic invention.

STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, basic knowledge needed in today’s fast paced world. The event Saturday focused on STEM projects and presentations designed by children in the county as part of the competition and the county-wide robotics programs.

“Our original goal was to start the program at the middle school, but as things progressed, we extended the program to the high school,” said Ed Williams, Colleton County robotics instructor. “Robotics prepares future engineers. The kids have to do research, math, and science tin order to complete an innovative project.

“Colleton is the only district on the I-95 corridor with a seamless robotics program.”

The robotics program begins with the Pre-K through first grade Discover Program where Head Start children begin learning about the program by playing with LEGOS.

After Head Start, children in the county’s elementary schools participate in the Explorer Program; this is for second - fourth grade. FIRST Tech challenge competitions continue for grades 4-8. FIRST LEGO League competitions are for grades pre-k through eighth grade. Then FIRST Robotics competitions are for grades 9-12, with FIRST LEGO league, FIRST Tech Challenge, and FIRST Robotics Competitions. As children grow and compete, the competition is more intense.

“This really gives me hope for the future. My son is four and has already started robotics. I have been looking at the Boeing company that has a booth here, and I noticed all the skills and job opportunities that robotics provide,” said Ebony Nesmith, a parent at the competition.

Boeing representatives said they were happy to be at the event. “These programs and competitions help inspire future generations of STEM based professionals. As a corporate sponsor, we are proud to support these competitions, locally and nationally,” said Frank Hatten, program manager and education relations specialist from Boeing.

Colleton Middle School also competed and decided to use solar and lunar energy in their product. “Our problem to solve was that the battery for the average delivery drone dies fairly quickly. Our solution was to take NASA’s unbuilt solar drone and improve it to make a solar/lunar powered drone,” said Annaleese Jameson of CMS.

Their idea was so good that the CCMS Robotics Team 9502 advanced to State where they will compete Saturday, February 19 at Cane Bay High School. Team members are Na’ziyah Washington, Annaleese Jameson, Renz Manuel, Jason Scott, Aiden Smoak. The competition for high schools will be held on February 26 at Dreher High School in Columbia.

Cottageville Elementary won first place in the Innovation Project, the Forest Hills City Slicers won the Breakthrough award and Bells Elementary won the Rising Star award.

Allie Stephen’s, a tenth grader at CCHS, won the Volunteer Award, and Mrs. Nikita Holmes won the Coaches Award.

The Colleton robotics programs have already won many awards, and the interest is growing. If parents want to get their children involved, they can contact their schools and find out about the program. Parents can also go to www.firstsouthcarolina.org or firstinspires.org. Parents are needed as volunteers and are needed to support the kids in their STEM activities.

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