Fencing Companyin Ridgeville, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in Ridgeville. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in Ridgeville, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in Ridgeville, SC

Palmetto Fossil Excursions team uncovers rare walrus skull with tusks in Ridgeville

RIDGEVILLE — Lowcountry paleontologist Skye Basak credits recent torrential rains for her team’s discovery of a tusked walrus skull dating back roughly 2 million years.Basak and her staff at Palmetto Fossil Excursions found the basketball-sized skull buried about 25 feet below the surface in a part of Ridgeville that scientists believe to be an ancient barrier island. It will be donated to the College of Charleston’s Mace Brown...

RIDGEVILLE — Lowcountry paleontologist Skye Basak credits recent torrential rains for her team’s discovery of a tusked walrus skull dating back roughly 2 million years.

Basak and her staff at Palmetto Fossil Excursions found the basketball-sized skull buried about 25 feet below the surface in a part of Ridgeville that scientists believe to be an ancient barrier island. It will be donated to the College of Charleston’s Mace Brown Museum of Natural History.

Basak has uncovered several other fossils in the same area over time, but this one was special. When the team found it, Basak said she was “completely out of this world excited,” jumping with joy and “freaking out.”

“Of all the things that we could have possibly unearthed on this recovery mission this was by far the most sought-after speciman,” said Basak, co-owner of Palmetto Fossil Excursions, a charter paleontology service. “For me, it was the goal.”

Recent rainfall caused part of the skull and both of the tusks to separate. But all of the pieces were recovered and will be reconstructed.

It is rare to find complete walrus skulls with both tusks, and that’s one reason this particular fossil is special. It belongs to the extinct type Ontocetus.

There are about three or four partial-to-complete Ontocetus skulls known in the world, according to College of Charleston research associate and adjunct instructor Robert Boessenecker. He said there are 2½ skulls from the Netherlands and Belgium and a nice one from Japan.

The local skull is likely the only one in the United States of this genus, which ranged as far south as Florida and Morocco and northward to the Netherlands back in ancient times.

Researchers will likely conduct further research on the skull once it is turned over to the museum.

“Because it’s one of only a few skulls of this genus known worldwide, it might be a new species because it’s much younger, geologically speaking, than all the other specimens,” Boessenecker said.

South Carolina may not seem like the ideal environment for walruses. But the animals have only been glacial for 100,000 or 200,000 years, according to Boessenecker.

“We know it had a climatic tolerance, kind of like a modern monk seal, living in subtropical through at least temperate waters and possibly cold-temperate,” Boessenecker said.

The animal’s characteristics resembled sea lions but with curved tusks. Modern walrus tusks are straight.

Basak and the others from the excursion group have found several other fossils in the state belonging to extinct species. Earlier this year they uncovered a giant prehistoric whale flipper about 200 feet away from where the walrus skull was found.

“So many people that live here don’t even realize what’s beneath their feet,” Basak said. “It’s kind of a goal for me to revolutionize that, to bring it to the forefront for the people of South Carolina.”

Her company has donated several scientifically critical specimens to the Mace Brown Museum, including the whale flipper. Once the walrus skull is donated, Boessenecker said it will be catalogued and put on display.

Thompkins Wins Bassmaster Open Tournament At Chesapeake Bay

https://www.bassresource.com/bass_fishing_123/bass-chesapeake-91022.html B.A.S.S. NewsCECIL COUNTY, Md. — JT Thompkins was a man on a mission and his Championship Saturday performance fulfilled this truth with a 17-pound, 4-ounce limit that capped a three-day total of 39-12 and propelled him to victory in the Bassmaster Northern Open tournament at Upper Chesapeake Bay. After posting weights of 11-0 and 11-8, Thompkins started Day 3 in ninth place — 11-6 off the lead set by Chris Beaudrie. At the final tally, he had edged ...

https://www.bassresource.com/bass_fishing_123/bass-chesapeake-91022.html B.A.S.S. News

CECIL COUNTY, Md. — JT Thompkins was a man on a mission and his Championship Saturday performance fulfilled this truth with a 17-pound, 4-ounce limit that capped a three-day total of 39-12 and propelled him to victory in the Bassmaster Northern Open tournament at Upper Chesapeake Bay. After posting weights of 11-0 and 11-8, Thompkins started Day 3 in ninth place — 11-6 off the lead set by Chris Beaudrie. At the final tally, he had edged Beaudrie by 15 ounces. For his win, the 20-year-old from Myrtle Beach, S.C., earned $42,267 and a berth in the 2023 Bassmaster Classic.

“I didn’t think there was any way for this to happen; I don’t even know what to say,” Thompkins said of his come-from-behind victory. “This whole year, I’ve talked about dreaming of going to the Classic. It’s a dream come true.

“This was a tournament where I just had to make sure not to slip up and if I had an opportunity, to take advantage. I’m so happy to have this bag today to be able to do that.”

Maximizing his time, Thompkins stayed within sight of the weigh-in venue for most of the tournament. Working broad grass flats in 2 to 9 feet, he targeted hard-cover current breaks.

“I found this area in pre-practice; I was just scanning and I saw the stumps and it set up perfectly,” Thompkins said. “I really didn’t fish it in practice. I just knew that’s where it was gonna go down.”

Thompkins caught his Day 3 fish on a 1/2-ounce craw-colored Outkast Tackle jig with a green pumpkin Strike King Rage Menace. Earlier in the event, he also caught bass on a Senko and a ChatterBait.

“This was a day where everything worked out and every decision that I made, every time I made a move, there was a fish waiting for me,” he said.

“I caught more fish today than I caught the entire practice. I figured some things out today because the first two days, I messed up (my tide decisions). Today, I was able to correct that, and I was able to capitalize on a lot of things.”

Thompkins got off to a blistering start with a limit of approximately 14 1/2 pounds by 7:40 a.m. After a dry spell, he added a key afternoon cull that sealed his win. Sweetening his victory, Thompkins won his first Bassmaster Open on his mother’s birthday. “I want to let my mom know I love her and how much she means to me.”

Hailing from Princeton, Ky., Beaudrie finished second with 38-13. On Day 1, he placed second with 17-8, just 11 ounces off the lead. Adding 16-6 on Day 2 pushed him into the top spot. Unfortunately, Beaudrie’s productivity fizzled on Championship Saturday and he managed only three bass for 4-15. Beaudrie had been working matted vegetation with lots of baitfish in the Susquehanna River. With the weekend’s full moon pushing tides higher than normal, Beaudrie’s fish rode the rising level deeper into the mats. Following their progression and fishing a frog superslow delivered his two big bags.

“I found those fish in practice throwing a Picasso Lures spinnerbait,” Beaudrie said. “They were off the edge of the grass mat and during the tournament, I saw the conditions change, so I adjusted to throwing a white frog and punching a green pumpkin Senko.”

Beaudrie noted that switching from his standard 7-foot, 4-inch frog rod to a 7-7 heavy iRod and 65-pound Vicious braid helped him wrestle bass out of the vegetation from deep in the mat.

Pete Gluszek of Mount Laurel, N.J., finished third with 37-2. His first two days’ limits of 15-9 and 10-8 sent him to Championship Saturday in third place. Closing with 11-1 kept him at that spot. With 30 years of guiding and instructional work on the Chesapeake Bay, the Bass University founder leaned on his extensive local knowledge to work through the tough summer conditions and dial in a particular pattern.

“September scatters the fish; the baitfish are scattered, the bass are doing a bunch of different things and that makes it a little bit challenging,” he said. “I had a thing in the Susquehanna where I was fishing hard cover adjacent to grass beds and that’s where I was able to get bit consistently doing that.”

Gluszek targeted stumps, laydowns and docks where bass positioned to ambush passing bait pods. His main baits were a Rapala DT Fat, Texas-rigged Strike King Rage Bug with 3/8- and 1/2-ounce VMC weights and what he calls the Bass University Dean’s Rig — a Texas-rigged worm with a 1/16-ounce VMC Half Moon tail weight.

Cole Drummond of Effingham, S.C., won the $750 Phoenix Boats Big Bass award with his 5-13.

Alex Wetherell of Middletown, Conn., won the Bassmaster Northern Opens title with 572 points. Kyoya Fujita of Minamitsuru, Yamanashi, Japan, finished second with 566, followed by Keith Poche of Montgomery, Ala., with 549, Jacob Walker of Springville, Ala., with 547 and Thompkins with 537.

Wetherell, Fujita and Poche will receive invitations to fish the 2023 Bassmaster Elite Series. Notably, Fujita qualified during his first season fishing in America.

Cooper Gallant of Bowmanville, Canada, leads the overall Bassmaster Opens Angler of the Year standings with 983 points.

2022 Bassmaster Northern Open Tournament Upper Chesapeake 9/8-9/10 Chesapeake Bay, North East MD. (BOATER) Standings Day 3

Angler Hometown No./lbs-oz Pts Total $$$

1. JT Thompkins Myrtle Beach, SC 15 39-12 200 $42,267.00 Day 1: 5 11-00 Day 2: 5 11-08 Day 3: 5 17-04 2. Chris Beaudrie Princeton, KY 13 38-13 199 $20,287.00 Day 1: 5 17-08 Day 2: 5 16-06 Day 3: 3 04-15 3. Pete Gluszek Mount Laurel, NJ 15 37-02 198 $14,320.00 Day 1: 5 15-09 Day 2: 5 10-08 Day 3: 5 11-01 4. Trevor McKinney Benton, IL 14 37-00 197 $11,933.00 Day 1: 4 10-13 Day 2: 5 13-12 Day 3: 5 12-07 5. Kyle Austin Ridgeville, SC 15 35-09 196 $10,382.00 Day 1: 5 08-05 Day 2: 5 14-13 Day 3: 5 12-07 6. David Gaston Sylacauga, AL 15 35-08 195 $9,547.00 Day 1: 5 12-13 Day 2: 5 10-03 Day 3: 5 12-08 7. Duke Nave Oxford, PA 13 30-15 194 $8,950.00 Day 1: 3 10-14 Day 2: 5 11-06 Day 3: 5 08-11 8. Chad Pipkens Dewitt, MI 11 30-02 193 $8,353.00 Day 1: 5 14-06 Day 2: 3 09-08 Day 3: 3 06-04 9. Kyle Patrick Cooperstown, NY 12 24-13 192 $6,563.00 Day 1: 5 13-14 Day 2: 5 08-10 Day 3: 2 02-05 10. Brian Mullaney Ijamsville, MD 8 22-03 191 $10,143.00 Day 1: 5 15-00 Day 2: 3 07-03 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- PHOENIX BOATS BIG BASS Cole Drummond Effingham, SC 05-13 $750.00 ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Totals Day #Limits #Fish Weight 1 43 471 1045-02 2 33 391 866-08 3 6 38 87-14 ---------------------------------- 82 900 1999-08

Walmart Opens South Carolina Import Distribution Center

A 3 million-square-foot facility – equivalent in size to 52 football fields – is Walmart’s first import distribution center in the state of South Carolina to leverage the Port of Charleston.Walmart has opened a $220 million import distribution center in Ridgeville, S.C. The April 22 grand-opening event featured remarks from South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster and Mike Gray, Walmart’s SVP supply chain of operations, along with a congratulatory video from John Furner, president and CEO of Walmart, and ended with a...

A 3 million-square-foot facility – equivalent in size to 52 football fields – is Walmart’s first import distribution center in the state of South Carolina to leverage the Port of Charleston.

Walmart has opened a $220 million import distribution center in Ridgeville, S.C. The April 22 grand-opening event featured remarks from South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster and Mike Gray, Walmart’s SVP supply chain of operations, along with a congratulatory video from John Furner, president and CEO of Walmart, and ended with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

“Our team of more than 980 associates from Dorchester County and the surrounding communities are excited to officially open the doors to our new import distribution center,” said Jeff Holzbauer, general manager of the new facility, at the event. “South Carolina is home to some of the country’s most convenient and efficient modes of transportation, including the Port of Charleston and Interstates 26 and 95. Being a member of this community means having the advantage of the region’s existing infrastructure as well as a pool of experienced associates familiar with it. Cutting this ribbon today signifies our commitment to that community.”

“Walmart has been a long-time partner of South Carolina, and as years have passed, they have continued to double down on their commitment to our people and reinvest in our state,” noted McMaster. “Walmart hasn’t only created thousands of jobs in our state – it has become an integral part of the communities in which it operates. Today’s celebration is the result of our state working hard to be the ideal place to do business and a company recognizing the benefit of having our incredibly skilled workforce and premier ports system in its backyard.”

Dorchester County was chosen as the location for the facility because of South Carolina’s business-friendly environment and the county’s proximity to the nearby deep-water Port of Charleston. The new import distribution center will store and sort imported goods that arrive through Charleston – the country’s eighth-largest port – for delivery to 850 regional Walmart and Sam’s Club locations across the Southeast. Once fully up and running, the facility is expected to boost local port volumes by about 5%.

“Walmart is the recognized leader in supply chain innovation and performance,” observed SC Ports CEO Jim Newsome. “Having this world-class company choose our market for their seventh import distribution center is the ultimate vote of confidence in SC Ports and in South Carolina, further solidifying SC Ports as a leader in retail distribution. The strategic investments we have made in port infrastructure enable SC Ports to support global retailers’ supply chains. We are thrilled to partner with Walmart to further their growth and impact for years to come.”

The company also reportedly operates import distribution centers in Alabama, Georgia, Texas and Virginia, among other locations.

“We know our customers count on us for a broad assortment, and this new import distribution center will give us expanded access to seaports, in turn allowing us to deliver a wide selection of merchandise from around the globe,” said Mike Gray, SVP supply chain operations at Walmart. “We also strive to be a store of the community and are proud of how we’ve been able to leverage our investments in supply chain to create economic opportunity and jobs for the Dorchester County area.”

To bolster its supply chain network, the company is building and upgrading distribution and fulfillment centers in various U.S. and Canadian locations.

During the grand-opening event, Holzbauer revealed that the new facility is well on its way to exceeding its initial hiring goal of 1,000. Working with the Department of Commerce, Walmart expects to soon employ more than 1,300 local full-time associates at the facility. The company celebrated its commitment to the community with a contribution of $10,000 to Going Places, an area nonprofit organization that gives bicycles to kids in need.

Located at 1030 Timothy Creek Road, the 3 million-square-foot facility – equivalent in size to 52 football fields – is Walmart’s first import distribution center in the state of South Carolina to leverage the port.

Bentonville, Ark.-based Walmart operates approximately 10,500 stores under 46 banners in 24 countries, and e-commerce websites, employing 2.2 million-plus associates worldwide. Walmart U.S. is No. 1 on The PG 100, Progressive Grocer’s 2021 list of the top food and consumables retailers in North America. The company operates 122 retail units and employs more than 35,000 associates in South Carolina.

Ridgeville farm offers an alternative to buying produce at the grocery store

RIDGEVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – While inflation is impacting what you pay for food at the grocery store, a local farmer is making some changes to deal with economic realities.Hickory Bluff Berry Farms for years has offered a chance to pick your own strawberries. But you’ll soon have the chance to pick other produce in an effort to help you – and them – save money and time.Lowcountry farmer Michael Parker listed off many of the items grown at the farm in Ridgeville.“We grow strawberries, blueberrie...

RIDGEVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – While inflation is impacting what you pay for food at the grocery store, a local farmer is making some changes to deal with economic realities.

Hickory Bluff Berry Farms for years has offered a chance to pick your own strawberries. But you’ll soon have the chance to pick other produce in an effort to help you – and them – save money and time.

Lowcountry farmer Michael Parker listed off many of the items grown at the farm in Ridgeville.

“We grow strawberries, blueberries, blackberries – we grow a large variety of produce. We do green zucchini, golden zucchini, Zephyr squash; we grow lots of tomatoes and okra,” he said.

Since opening in 2008, they had strawberries available for U-Pick; but because it has become harder and harder to find people to help harvest their produce, they decided to make a change.

“We’ve actually implemented something this year to try and help with that. With the cost of labor going up and the lack of labor being able to help us, we’ve had to adjust,” Parker explained.

They have a new business model moving forward.

“Most of the produce that we generally pick and sell to large distributors, we’re not picking now till you pick and that allows the everyday person to bring the kids out or come out and select what they want at a fraction of the cost at the store or even here at the stand.”

You can pick the produce, not including the berries, for just a flat rate of $1.50 per pound.

“I like all of our produce; it’s $1.50 a pound. People [can] dig their own potatoes, pick their squash, go pick their own cucumbers.”

Parker went on to say, “We’re trying to shave cost as much as we can. We’ve changed the way that we farm- we’re not spraying the toxic pesticides and chemicals and stuff as much anymore because it costs so much to get it.”

Parker said they are trying their best as farmers to feed as many people as they can at an affordable price.

The Hickory Bluff Berry Farms is open Monday through Saturday from 9 AM until 5 PM. They may open Friday nights from time to time.

Walmart Announces Grand Opening of South Carolina Import Distribution Center; Mike Gray, Andrew Dale, and Jeff Holzbauer Share

Sponsored Message Learn MoreRIDGEVILLE, SC - Bolstering its import network, Walmart recently held a grand opening event for its new import distribution center. Located in South Carolina, the 3 million-square-foot facility will leverage the deep-water Port of Charleston to provide convenient cargo access.“We know our customers count on us for a broad assortment, and this new import distribution ...

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RIDGEVILLE, SC - Bolstering its import network, Walmart recently held a grand opening event for its new import distribution center. Located in South Carolina, the 3 million-square-foot facility will leverage the deep-water Port of Charleston to provide convenient cargo access.

“We know our customers count on us for a broad assortment, and this new import distribution center will give us expanded access to seaports, in turn allowing us to deliver a wide selection of merchandise from around the globe,” said Mike Gray, Senior Vice President, Supply Chain Operations. “We also strive to be a store of the community and are proud of how we’ve been able to leverage our investments in the supply chain to create economic opportunity and jobs for the Dorchester County area.”

Walmart selected South Carolina for the facility due to its business-friendly environment and decided on Dorchester County for its proximity to the Port of Charleston, a press release explained.

This new import distribution center will store and sort imported products that arrive through the port for later delivery to 850 regional Walmart and Sam’ Club locations in the Southeast. As soon as the facility is fully operational, it is expected to increase local port volumes by almost 5 percent.

“Our team of more than 980 associates from Dorchester County and the surrounding communities are excited to officially open the doors to our new Import Distribution Center,” said Jeff Holzbauer, General Manager, Import Distribution Center #8980, at the grand opening event. “South Carolina is home to some of the country’s most convenient and efficient modes of transportation, including the Port of Charleston and Interstates 26 and 95. Being a member of this community means having the advantage of the region’s existing infrastructure as well as a pool of experienced associates familiar with it. Cutting this ribbon today signifies our commitment to that community.”

The retailer’s initial hiring goal for the distribution center was 1,000 associates, meaning that Walmart is well on its way to achieving those numbers. Working with the Department of Commerce, Walmart expects to employ over 1,300 local full-time associates at this new operation.

“We are actively staffing Ridgeville with a team that will play an important role in serving our customers,” said Andrew Dale, Senior Director of U.S. Supply Chain People. “Walmart is dedicated to the training and development of its associates. Each of the positions we’re currently hiring for in Ridgeville brings with it a pathway of lifelong career opportunity that, with Walmart’s scale, has industry-changing impact. Walmart is full of everyday people doing extraordinary things.”

To read more about Walmart’s latest facility, click here.

What other benefits will this new distribution center provide for the retailer? Only time and AndNowUKnow will tell, so keep reading.

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