Fencing Companyin Sullivan's Island, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in Sullivan's Island. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in Sullivan's Island, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

$30M private club floated for Sullivan’s Island gets cautious reception

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — A $30-million-plus private social hub being proposed for South Carolina’s wealthiest ZIP code is probably not going to advance very quickly.Sullivan’s Island’s Town Council didn’t give the Ocean Club on Atlantic Avenue a warm reception during its meeti...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — A $30-million-plus private social hub being proposed for South Carolina’s wealthiest ZIP code is probably not going to advance very quickly.

Sullivan’s Island’s Town Council didn’t give the Ocean Club on Atlantic Avenue a warm reception during its meeting Aug. 15. Elected officials indicated they wanted to wait to consider the big-ticket redevelopment project at what was known for decades as the Sand Dunes Club.

They said they hope to gather more information on the developer’s background, study traffic impacts and learn more about the financial and other implications to neighboring homes and the town.

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They also noted the club doesn’t have to be private, and alternate proposals should be considered that all residents could benefit from — not just those who can afford the estimated $60,000 membership fee and $6,000 in annual dues under the current plan.

“I don’t think we have enough information to make an intelligent decision,” said Councilwoman Jody Latham. “We don’t want to make the wrong decision either way.”

Mayor Patrick O’Neil called it “a giant decision” that will affect residents and Sullivan’s for generations to come.

Their comments came after more than two dozen residents spoke for and against the club concept.

The majority were in favor of the idea as a community gathering place while property owners who were against the plan said they viewed it as a commercial operation in a residential district. The opposition also questioned if officials would set a precedent by approving a conditional use for the property.

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The town also received about five dozen letters related to the proposed Ocean Club, with 32 in support and 27 opposed.

Shep Davis, managing partner of the Sullivan’s Island Bathing Co., is leading the effort to create the club. He asked Town Council to advance the proposal to a public hearing before the Planning Commission in September.

Brian Hellman, an attorney representing the developer, said that’s not going to happen since council members indicated they wanted more information.

The property first served as club for military personnel stationed at nearby Fort Moultrie starting in the 1930s. It later became a private beachside retreat for employees of the former South Carolina Electric & Gas Co.

Dominion Energy, which bought SCE&G in 2019, closed the Sand Dunes Club at the onset of the pandemic in early 2020. It was never reopened.

The 3.5-acre site is now owned by a company affiliated with Charleston real estate investor John Derbyshire, the former owner of the Money Man Pawn shop chain. His firm paid Dominion Energy $16.2 million for the property last year.

Dominion Energy's tree pruning plan sparks concerns on Sullivan's Island

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — A new project is coming to Sullivan’s Island that would affect the town’s trees.Dominion Energy will start pruning and removing overgrown trees in 2024 to protect nearby power lines. But some people living in the area have concerns.Some of the people News 4 spoke with weren’t happy with the job Dominion did during a similar project back in 2019, and they say they’re worried the same thing will happen again.With its upcoming project to safeguard 16 miles...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — A new project is coming to Sullivan’s Island that would affect the town’s trees.

Dominion Energy will start pruning and removing overgrown trees in 2024 to protect nearby power lines. But some people living in the area have concerns.

Some of the people News 4 spoke with weren’t happy with the job Dominion did during a similar project back in 2019, and they say they’re worried the same thing will happen again.

With its upcoming project to safeguard 16 miles of overhead power lines across Sullivan’s Island, Dominion Energy said it’s working to make sure residents understand the need for this work.

Dominion Energy's tree pruning plan sparks concerns on Sullivan's Island (WCIV)

Read more: "Sullivan's Island council members to reintroduce protective guidelines for Maritime Forest."

“Making sure customers understand how important safeguarding these overhead lines are to ensure not only the safety of our crews but also the safety of the general public,” said Dominion spokesperson Paul Fischer. “And that trees and tree limbs do represent the number one reason for power outages across our system.”

Dominion plans to trim, prune, and sometimes remove trees in the area that have grown too close to powerlines. It’s a project the utility did five years ago, and town officials remember hearing numerous complaints about its impact on trees.

Still, Mayor Patrick O’Neil said he recognizes how the 2019 project helped during recent storms like Hurricane Idalia.

“We were able to maintain continuous power essentially, and that probably would not have been the case if we'd still had a lot of trees that were up intruding on power lines,” said Mayor O’Neil.

Read more: "Dominion Energy to host workshop on vegetation management and safety at Sullivan's Island."

Mayor O’Neil said it’s a challenging issue to balance. The town wants safe, working power, but it also wants to protect and preserve its trees.

Especially Palmettos, which Sullivan’s Island has a deep history.

“Palmettos are a particular source of pain here in many ways because Sullivan's Island, as you know, is where the Palmetto tree became the state symbol,” Mayor O’Neil said.

For some long-time residents, the upcoming project reminds them of how upset they were the first time.

Read more: "'Need to be prosecuted:' Residents react to illegal cutting of Maritime Forest."

“I lived here in 2019 when Dominion was last here. And, I was very concerned, grieved, and outraged over what they did last time,” said Karen Byko, who’s lived in the area for 12 years.

Byko said Dominion violated the town's ANSI-300 pruning standards, causing trees to look tattered and butchered.

“I looked around at the work that they were doing, and honestly, I started to cry,” Byko said. “That's the quality or the lack of quality of work that was being performed at the time.”

Read more: "Edisto palmetto trees being cut down for safety precautions by Dominion Energy."

Byko hopes Dominion will listen to residents and do a better job this time.

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Dominion said the project is expected to start in January, and the work should be complete in about three months.

Sullivan’s Island neighbors hope that old Pitt Street Bridge area can be restored

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD)- During a sunny and clear day, the old Pitt Street Bridge or ‘Old Bridge’ on Sullivan’s Island is a spot for local fisherman to look for a fresh catch.“I like to fish up here because the Red Drum will travel down the grass line,” said Mark Thawley.Since 1985, Thawley has been coming to this enclave with his rod and string. He says that back then people at Haddrell’s Point Tackle shop told him that this spot was the best for fishing.“I’ve...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD)- During a sunny and clear day, the old Pitt Street Bridge or ‘Old Bridge’ on Sullivan’s Island is a spot for local fisherman to look for a fresh catch.

“I like to fish up here because the Red Drum will travel down the grass line,” said Mark Thawley.

Since 1985, Thawley has been coming to this enclave with his rod and string. He says that back then people at Haddrell’s Point Tackle shop told him that this spot was the best for fishing.

“I’ve been fishing here ever since. It’s that good of a spot,” said Thawley. “Last year on October 24 I caught a seven-pound flounder here; my biggest yet.”

But, Thawley’s saltwater sanctuary has long been dormant and is in need of repairs.

“It’s not very safe. There’s a little bench up there, but there’s no railing or anything like that. It’s a rugged little walk so old people might have a hard time. It’s not very safe for them either,” said Thawley.

The old Pitt Street Bridge once connected Mount Pleasant and Sullivan’s Island with trolleys going to and from each side. The remnants of the Old Bridge have stood in the water and on the banks for decades after the Ben Sawyer Bridge was built in 1945.

“It’s been sitting here idle, but it’s a piece of history for the town,” said Andy Benke, the Town Administrator for Sullivan’s Island. “It’s a great recreational place.”

Due to the old bridge’s historical significance, the Town of Sullivan’s Island wants to keep the structure intact. Since 2018, town leaders have been exploring methods to stabilize and restore the area from the erosion that’s impacted the shoreline.

“We watched earlier a large watercraft go by at a very slow bell, but he still drew water as he approached and he threw out a small wake as it went by,” said Benke. “It’s just constant motion on the docks near us and the Old Bridge. It causes water to wash up around the backside of this structure and eventually erosion.”

Other causes of erosion, mostly on the structure’s north side, are due to tidal flooding and rainfall.

The Town of Sullivan’s Island is getting closer to a solution though. Town Council is in the process of getting construction drawings to restore and stabilize the area. After that, a contractor can be hired and construction could begin in the fall of 2023.

“We’ll stabilize the foundation of the Old Bridge with an environmentally friendly product, sandbags, dirt and vegetation,” said Benke.

Hope for an improved Old Bridge has Thawley feeling optimistic that his favorite fishing spot will be even better than before.

“If they just put a little bit into it that would be great,” said Thawley.

SCE&G’s former seaside worker perk eyed for $30M-plus social club on Sullivan’s Island

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — A newly formed development group plans to invest more than $30 million to acquire and renovate a 90-year-old, vacant private oceanfront club on this seaside enclave.But elected officials want more details before signing off on allowing a commercial project in a residential area....

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — A newly formed development group plans to invest more than $30 million to acquire and renovate a 90-year-old, vacant private oceanfront club on this seaside enclave.

But elected officials want more details before signing off on allowing a commercial project in a residential area.

Sullivan’s Island Bathing Co. is asking the town to allow a members-only social venture called the Ocean Club at 1735 Atlantic Ave. as a conditional use in an area zoned for single-family homes.

Shep Davis, the development firm’s managing partner, pointed out last week that the property operated as a private club for close to a century without being open to island residents.

Under this latest proposal, they’ll have that option for the first time — at a cost of a $60,000 sign-up fee and an estimated $500 in monthly dues.

The property had been known for decades as the Sand Dunes Club. It was a private beachside retreat for employees of the former South Carolina Electric & Gas Co., which Dominion Energy acquired in early 2019 after the V.C. Summer nuclear plant debacle 18 months earlier.

The Richmond, Va.-based utility closed the property at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, and it never reopened, according to attorney Brian Hellman, a Sullivan’s resident who is representing the development group.

Built in 1933 for $14,000, the then 5,400-square-foot structure was called Jasper Hall, an officer’s club for military personnel stationed at nearby Fort Moultrie. SCE&G acquired it in the 1950s and expanded it over the years to just under 10,000 square feet.

Davis said the property has not been properly kept up for several years and is in disrepair.

One neighbor recently complained of the uncovered pool starting to smell and becoming a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Hellman and Davis said the pool is being maintained.

$30 million-plus

Davis estimated it will take an investment of “in excess of $30 million” for his group to buy the property, overhaul the building and amenities and place a stormwater retention pond underground. Retrofitting the pool alone, he said could cost half a million dollars.

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Improvement plans include offering separate pools for families and adults, upgrading the existing building and landscaping the parking area. The developers also would add a fitness center, dining terrace and gazebo along with a new entry area off a beach access path.

“We can preserve the building and re-create the club for its historical use,” Davis said.

Hellman said the current proposal comes after gathering input during several meetings with residents and town leaders over the past few months.

He said the private-membership venue will provide a place for homeowners to eat and exercise without having to drive off the island or jockey for tables with tourists at the restaurants in the town’s small business district.

“It will be a gathering place to socialize that won’t compete with beachgoers,” Hellman said. “Dining will not be open to the general public and will reduce the need for residents to leave the island.”

The 3.5-acre club site is owned by a company affiliated with Charleston real estate investor John Derbyshire, the former owner of the chain of Money Man Pawn shops. The firm paid Dominion $16.2 million for the property in 2022, according to Charleston County land records.

A large house is being built for Derbyshire, who plans to remain a partner in the project, on part of the property next to the club, according to Hellman.

Members matters

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The developer said the goal is that the Ocean Club will be open to all Sullivan’s residents who want to join. Davis estimated the venture will need at least 400 members to get the project off the ground.

The proposed Ocean Club would give priority to individuals and families who primarily reside on the island, said Jim Wanless, one of the partners. Off-island residents could join, too.

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The proposed parking rules to allow a social club in a residential area require at least one parking space for every 10 memberships whose primary or secondary residences are within 2½ miles. Sixty percent of those spaces must be designated for golf carts and low-speed vehicles.

For members living outside the 2½-mile range, which is basically anyone who doesn’t live on Sullivan’s, one vehicle parking space would be required for every five memberships.

The rules also would require one bicycle space — through a rack or corral — for every 20 memberships.

“For whatever the number will be of those living off the island, they most certainly would come by car,” Davis said. “On-island residents would have much less need for parking” since they’d have the option to come by golf cart, bike or foot.

Tentative plans call for 50 car parking spaces, at least an equal number of golf cart spaces and “adequate” bicycle parking spaces, Hellman said.

Though the membership will be open to all island residents, the developers don’t expect everyone to join. They also have not set a cap on membership.

“We are trying to come up with the right number of members for the club without excluding property owners,” Davis said.

Talking to the town

During a public workshop last week, where a standing-room-only crowd spilled into the hallway, the developers addressed a list of written questions from elected officials, including the benefit to the town if the club is allowed.

A decades-old Lowcountry truck terminal was idled this summer by a high-profile business failure, its owner running on fumes.

It’s poised to rev back to life.

The former Yellow Corp. depot between Rivers Avenue and Interstate 26 in North Charleston and two others in South Carolina are among the properties that onetime rivals of the fallen company and other opportunistic buyers snapped up at a U.S. Bankruptcy Court auction in Delaware.

The sales, totaling about $1.9 billion for about 75 percent of the roughly 180 freight yards and service centers that went on the block, were approved last week.

The other Palmetto State sites changing hands are in West Columbia and Piedmont, southwest of Greenville.

Yellow’s remaining real estate holdings are still in play, including a recently shuttered terminal in Florence.

The North Charleston depot had been in business since at least 1967, when it was run by a familiar name in the tractor-trailer business: Roadway Express.

Twenty years ago Nashville-based Yellow eased into the fast lane. It acquired Roadway for $1.05 billion in December 2003 and became the No. 3 player in the U.S. logistic industry’s “less-than-truckload” niche, which specializes in moving smaller loads for multiple customers within a single trailer.

Some two decades on, Yellow was broken down on the side of the road. The company filed for bankruptcy protection in August after years of financial struggles and $1.3 billion in debt, not including its unsecured liabilities.

The collapse marked the biggest-ever failure of a U.S. trucking business. It was more than noteworthy that just three years earlier Yellow had received $700 million in pandemic-era loans from the U.S. government to keep it afloat.

Rather than try to fix the financial wear and tear, the fallen 99-year-old trucking icon known for its cheap rates decided instead to shut down and sell its real estate, rigs and other assets to repay creditors.

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