Fencing Companyin Seabrook Island, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in Seabrook Island. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in Seabrook Island, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in Seabrook Island, SC

South Carolina Supreme Court returns 14 congregations to Episcopal diocese

[Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina] The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled April 20 that 14 South Carolina churches that were once part of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina shall be returned, along with all real and personal property held in trust for the diocese, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center on Seabrook Island.The churches left the diocese in 2012 and later joined the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and the April 20 news marks another milestone in a nearly decade-lo...

[Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina] The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled April 20 that 14 South Carolina churches that were once part of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina shall be returned, along with all real and personal property held in trust for the diocese, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center on Seabrook Island.

The churches left the diocese in 2012 and later joined the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and the April 20 news marks another milestone in a nearly decade-long legal journey that included a lower court decision in 2014 which was largely overturned by the state’s high court in 2017 and then further clarified with the decision this week.

Of the decision, the Rt. Rev. Ruth Woodliff-Stanley, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, said: “Their decisions will no doubt bring joy to many in our diocese, but for others, there will be grief in the possible finality of a loss they have been feeling for nearly 10 years.” She also added a hope for the future of the reconciled diocese: “We now walk into a bright future, one in which we will focus on the reconciling power of the Gospel to transform injustice, to heal the brokenhearted, and to build God’s beloved community.”

The South Carolina Supreme Court, using a variety of determining factors, decided that 14 parishes (of the 29 previously named) did create an “irrevocable trust in favor of the National Church and its diocese” (the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina – the “Associated Diocese”). These 14 parishes are as follows: Christ Church, Mt. Pleasant; Good Shepherd, Charleston; Holy Comforter, Sumter; Holy Cross, Stateburg; Holy Trinity, Charleston; St. Bartholomew’s, Hartsville; St. David’s, Cheraw; St. Luke’s, Hilton Head; St. Matthew’s, Fort Motte; St. James, Charleston; St. John’s, Johns Island; St. Jude’s, Walterboro; Trinity, Myrtle Beach; and Old St. Andrew’s, Charleston.

Conversely, the Court found that 15 of the 29 parishes “did not create a trust in favor of the National Church or its diocese, and thus those 15 Parishes retain title to their real estate.” These parishes are as follows: All Saints, Florence; Church of our Saviour, John’s Island; Church of the Cross, Bluffton; Christ-St. Paul’s, Yonges Island; Epiphany, Eutawville; Redeemer, Orangeburg; Resurrection, Surfside/Myrtle Beach; St. Helena’s, Beaufort; St. Paul’s, Bennettsville; St. Paul’s, Summerville; St. Philip’s, Charleston; St. Luke & St. Paul, Charleston; St. Michael’s, Charleston; Trinity, Edisto; and Trinity, Pinopolis.

The South Carolina Supreme Court has decided that all real and personal property, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center, have been held “in trust for the benefit of the National Church [The Episcopal Church] and the Associated Diocese,” meaning the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. The ruling further concluded that “the real and personal property held in trust by the Trustees is now held for the benefit of the Associated Diocese.”

On all matters and questions relating to “names, styles, emblems, and service marks,” the Court deferred to the federal court. The U.S. District Court previously ruled in favor of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina (also recognized as The Episcopal Church in South Carolina) in September 2019. This decision has been appealed, but any future rulings were stayed pending the outcome of this state case.

In her pastoral letter to the diocese sent hours after receiving the opinion, Woodlff-Stanley discussed the next steps for the diocese. “We are still working to understand the immediate path forward and promise to be in communication with you as our legal team helps us determine what comes next,” said Woodliff-Stanley. “May we focus together on reconciliation and the way of love as we journey together on the road ahead, centered in Christ’s love for all of us.”

The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina was one of the nine original dioceses that formed The Episcopal Church in 1785. The Episcopal Church, which encompasses 111 dioceses and regional areas in 17 nations of the world, remains the only denomination in the United States affiliated with the worldwide Anglican Communion.

Columbia one of 4 SC places ranked as best Southern weekend getaways by Country Living magazine

Columbia made Country Living’s top 10 best Southern weekend getaways, coming in at No. 10 and beating out perennial list favorite Greenville (13), Lake Murray (18) and Seabrook Island (24).The magazine listed 30 places to consider spending a weekend instead of Charleston and Nashville.“Charleston and Nashville are fun, but it’s time to head somewhere new,”...

Columbia made Country Living’s top 10 best Southern weekend getaways, coming in at No. 10 and beating out perennial list favorite Greenville (13), Lake Murray (18) and Seabrook Island (24).

The magazine listed 30 places to consider spending a weekend instead of Charleston and Nashville.

“Charleston and Nashville are fun, but it’s time to head somewhere new,” the headline said.

About Columbia, the magazine said, “Pulsing with a vibrant, artsy energy, downtown Columbia is sprinkled with enough bakeries, boutiques, restaurants and coffee shops to set the backdrop for RGMs (Really Good Memories).”

The magazine said Columbia has a “Mayberry-esque” quality.

Recommendations included staying at the Inn at USC, “where you can spend hours relaxing on the wide wrap-around porch,” Hunter-Gatherer Brewery and Alehouse, Old Mill Antique Mall in West Columbia, and Cafe Strudel.

The magazine said of Lake Murray, “Many people don’t know there’s 500 miles of undisturbed shoreline less than a half-hour drive outside of downtown Columbia. Many people are missing out.”

They called the lake an “idyllic getaway” and the state’s best-kept secret.

“You’ll find pristine views, hidden coves, and a glassy, peaceful lake,” the magazine said.

Highlighted were River Runner, Brickhouse Campground, The Rusty Anchor and Newberry Manor.

About Greenville, the magazine suggested boozy milkshakes at Grill Marks and a number of other restaurants such as Sidewall Pizza, Biscuit Head and The Anchorage. Falls Park and M.Judson Booksellers and Storytellers were highlighted, too.

Seabrook Island is a “quiet, laid-back sanctuary,” rife with the opportunity to beachcomb, watch dolphins, go crabbing, play pickleball or ride horses.

They suggested Water Dog for a stand-up paddleboarding tour.

“ If you’re feeling less-than-ambitious, try lazing around at your villa or townhouse rental (complete with ocean or tidal creek views),” the magazine said, before recommending “a night out on the town in Uber-able Charleston.”

Other areas in the top 10 were No. 1 Danville, Kentucky; followed by Hot Springs, Arkansas; Flat Rock, North Carolina; Bardstown, Kentucky; Bay St. Louis, Mississippi; Blowing Rock, North Carolina; Bowling Green, Kentucky; Charlottesville, Virginia and Islamorada, Florida.

This story was originally published May 20, 2022 11:27 AM.

Thursday headlines: Breakaway churches ordered by high court to return property to national Episcopalians

Nearly a decade ago, more than two dozen parishes broke away from the national Episcopal Church. But on Wednesday after years of legal wrangling, the South Carolina Supreme Court ordered 14 of the 29 parishes that broke away must return its property to the Episcopal Church and its ...

Nearly a decade ago, more than two dozen parishes broke away from the national Episcopal Church. But on Wednesday after years of legal wrangling, the South Carolina Supreme Court ordered 14 of the 29 parishes that broke away must return its property to the Episcopal Church and its affiliated South Carolina diocese. The court also ordered turnover of Camp St. Christopher on Seabrook Island to the national church, which is represented by 29 parishes from Charleston to Columbia.

Among the breakaway churches in what is called the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina that will have to hand over their property include congregations in Charleston (Good Shepherd, Old St. Andrew’s, Holy Trinity) and Sumter, Walterboro, Hilton Head Island, Stateburg, Mount Pleasant (Christ Church) and James Island. Those not affected by the ruling include historic St. Phillip’s and St. Michael’s in downtown Charleston as well as churches in Bluffton, Beaufort, Conway, Summerville and Orangeburg.

In other recent headlines:

S.C. court halts execution by firing squad. The state Supreme Court issued a temporary stay on Wednesday, delaying its first-ever execution by firing squad due to a litigation in another court challenging the constitutionality of South Carolina’s execution methods.

S.C. Senate unanimously supports early voting. The South Carolina senate is showing unanimous, bipartisan support for an early voting bill that unanimously passed in the S.C. House in March. But in doing so, added that senators have the power to confirm the governor’s choices for the director and the five members of the board of the South Carolina Election Commission. The House is unlikely to approve the changes.

S.C. bill to curb abortions advances. The bill will give women 18 and older more access to birth control or other hormonal contraceptives by going directly to a pharmacist without a doctor’s prescription.

Proposal to bring new life to old West Ashley grocery store lot. The West Ashley Revitalization Commission heard a proposal on Monday of turning the old Piggly Wiggly property on Sam Rittenberg Blvd. into a community hub, consisting of small businesses, a restaurant with rooftop dining and city offices to the property.

Charleston residents want to limit student-style housing in neighborhoods. Charleston-area residents, mainly those who live in the downtown peninsula, attended a city planning commission meeting to join talks of developers building student-style housing from Radcliffe Street to Market Street. The City of Charleston proposed an overlay zone requiring more requirements for developers to purchase land and build housing.

To get dozens of South Carolina news stories every business day, contact the folks at SC Clips.

From the mountains to the ocean, list ranks best golf courses in South Carolina

South Carolina is blessed with an embarrassment of riches in golf courses, a fact on display in examining one organization’s ranking of playing opportunities in the state.From the brawny Ocean Course at Kiawah Island Resort to the Aiken Golf Club that measures less than 5,800 yards and everything in between, the Palmetto State offers a smorgasbord of links that whets every golfer’s appetite.The South Carolina Golf C...

South Carolina is blessed with an embarrassment of riches in golf courses, a fact on display in examining one organization’s ranking of playing opportunities in the state.

From the brawny Ocean Course at Kiawah Island Resort to the Aiken Golf Club that measures less than 5,800 yards and everything in between, the Palmetto State offers a smorgasbord of links that whets every golfer’s appetite.

The South Carolina Golf Course Rating Panel’s annual survey emphasizes the obvious again in this year’s rankings of the best classic courses, designed pre-1980, and modern layout, those designed since 1980.

The Ocean Course, scene of high-profile events ranging from the 1991 Ryder Cup to PGA Championships in 2012 and 2021, takes its usual place at the top of the modern category. Harbour Town Golf Links at Hilton Head Island’s Sea Pines Resort, the home of the PGA Tour’s RBC Heritage each April, headlines the classics.

And those only scratch the surface.

“There are so many great golf courses in the state,” Aiken GC owner Jim McNair Jr. said. “There’s something from everyone. We have something like 37 acres of turf; I imagine a course like the Dunes (Golf and Beach Club in Myrtle Beach) has 100 acres or more.”

McNair’s course, located within shouting distance of Aiken’s business district, ranks seventh in the classic category and drips with history. More than 100 years old, the club is among the first to have women’s tees and staged the Women’s Invitational Tournament (1937-39) that brought stars such as Babe Zaharias and Patty Berg to compete.

“We’re short by today’s standards, but we have members who say it’s too hard from the tips,” McNair said. “The green complexes are incredible. The course is about strategy, accuracy and position off the tee.”

Those are among the qualities the rating panel seeks and finds everywhere in the state.

Courses represented in this year’s rankings range from Aiken’s Palmetto Golf Club, which dates to 1892; Seth Raynor’s Lowcountry gems; Camden Country Club with Donald Ross’ influence and Robert Trent Jones’ beauties among the classics. The modern layouts include the handiwork of, among others, Pete Dye, Tom Fazio, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Mike Strantz.

“Ranking the courses is really a challenge,” said Michael Whitaker, the association’s executive director. “As always, there are so many outstanding golf courses in South Carolina that you’re really splitting hairs in picking one over another.”

The top five in the classic category include Harbour Town, Yeamans Hall in Hanahan, Palmetto GC, the Dunes Golf and Beach Club, and Greenville CC’s Chanticleer Course. Joining the Ocean Course at the top of the modern list are the Secession Club (Beaufort), Congaree GC (Ridgeland), May River GC (Palmetto Bluff) and Sage Valley GC (Graniteville).

“To be included on a list with some of those exclusive private clubs is quite an honor,” McNair said. “That’s the beauty of the game. Courses such as ours and the Ocean Course are very different and yet are very challenging.”

The S.C. Golf Course Ratings Panel is composed of 125 golf enthusiasts who represent a diverse range of occupations, handicaps and backgrounds. The group’s objective is to promote excellence in the state’s golf course design and operation through competitive ranking, education and public advocacy. Criteria used in the judging include routing, variety, strategy, equity, memorability, aesthetics and experience. A panelist must have played the course to vote for it.

Classic Courses

(Designed Before 1980)

1. Harbour Town Golf Links

2. Yeamans Hall Club

3. Palmetto Golf Club

4. Dunes Golf and Beach Club

5. Greenville CC Chanticleer Course

6. CC of Charleston

7. Aiken Golf Club

8. Camden CC

9. Greenville CC Riverside Course

10. Surf Golf and Beach Club

11. Orangeburg CC

12. Florence CC

13. CC or Spartanburg

14. Myrtle Beach National King’s North Course

15. Columbia CC

16. Palmetto Dunes Resort R.T. Jones Course

17. Palmetto Dunes Resort George Fazio Course

18. Charleston Municipal Golf Course

19. Furman Golf Club

20. Pine Lakes CC

Modern Courses

(Designed Since 1980)

1. Kiawah Island Resort Ocean Course

2. Secession GC

3. Congaree GC

4. May River GC

5. Sage Valley GC

6. Cherokee Plantation

7. Kiawah Island Club Cassique Course

8. Long Cove Club

9, Chechessee Creek Club

10. Kiawah Island Club River Course

11. Bulls Bay Club

12. Caledonia Golf and Fish Club

13. Colleton River Plantation Dye Course

14. Old Tabby Links

15. Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards

16. Colleton River Plantation Nicklaus Course

17. Cliffs at Mountain Park.

18. Musgrove Mill GC

19. The GC at Briar’s Creek

20. Haig Point Club

21. Barefoot Resort Dye Course

22. Wachesaw Plantation Club

23. Belfair GC West Course

24. Reserve at Lake Keowee

25. Cliffs at Glassy

26. Tidewater GC and Plantation

27. Berkeley Hall North Course

28. Belfair GC East Course

29. True Blue Plantation

30. Grande Dunes Resort Club

31. Dataw Island Cotton Dyke Course

32. Wild Dunes Resort Links Course

33. Thornblade Club

34. Prestwick CC

35. Kiawah Island Resort Osprey Course

36. Cliffs at Keowee Falls

37. DeBordieu Club

38. Callawassie Island Club

T39. Oldfield

T39. Kiawah Island Resort Cougar Point Course

41. Reserve Club at Pawleys Island

41. Sea Pines Resort Atlantic Dunes Course

43. Daniel Island Club Beresford Creek Course

44. Kiawah Island Resort Turtle Point Course

45. Grande Dunes Members Club

46. Cliffs at Keowee Springs

47. Seabrook Island Club Ocean Winds Course

48. Berkeley Hall South Course

49. Cliffs Valley Course

50. Daniel Island Club Ralston Creek Course.

Commentary: On Johns Island, a sixth road alternative will save our sense of place

Johns Island is much more than a traffic jam: It is a collection of people with deep connections to place and community. Many have been here for generations and have roots in the island’s agricultural history. More are new neighbors who moved to this beautiful Sea Island seeking a purposeful way of life.The island’s roads are in dire need of improvement, which is one reason Charleston County residents voted for the 2016 half-cent sales tax to fund necessary upgrades, such as improvements along the Main Road Corridor. Work ...

Johns Island is much more than a traffic jam: It is a collection of people with deep connections to place and community. Many have been here for generations and have roots in the island’s agricultural history. More are new neighbors who moved to this beautiful Sea Island seeking a purposeful way of life.

The island’s roads are in dire need of improvement, which is one reason Charleston County residents voted for the 2016 half-cent sales tax to fund necessary upgrades, such as improvements along the Main Road Corridor. Work on Segment A, or the flyover at U.S. Highway 17 and Main Road, is moving forward, and now the county is considering Segment C: improvements to Bohicket Road, from Maybank Highway to Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

All five alternative proposed designs create four- and five-lane highways through the southern portion of Johns Island, drastically changing its character.

Hence the formation of Rational Roads, a nonprofit advocacy group whose goal is to develop a more effective, less destructive solution to the five unacceptable options provided in 2020 for the Main Road Segment C project.

Change is hard. New ideas are often deemed “radical” or even “irrational.” But change is necessary. Too many highways in Charleston have cut through and destroyed communities due to a lack of creative visioning. Better, more local solutions for road improvements exist, and to get there, the community must be engaged. Because who understands the safety concerns and chokepoints better than the local community? Transportation planners, engineers and elected officials should rely on community members’ insight from the beginning.

Our grassroots methodology is steeped in community feedback and data. Rational Roads has hosted more than a dozen meetings in the past year via Zoom and at churches, breweries, community gatherings and farmers markets. We’ve engaged developers, conservationists, pastors, students, farmers and more. We have found that Johns Islanders are deeply connected to the soul and preservation of this island. And we know that 21st century problems can’t be solved with 20th century solutions, especially when it comes to road building.

At Rational Roads, we are asking County Council to update the “purpose and need” for the Main Road Segment C project; that’s what will guide the direction of the Segment C project. We feel strongly that the purpose and need should include safety. Johns Island needs a customized approach for our community that goes beyond a five-lane road from point A to point B, stripping our community of its character and missing a critical opportunity to address safety concerns and create a connected sense of place.

We raised funds to work with traffic engineers to develop a sixth alternative, one that addresses our island’s traffic needs by adding left-turn lanes, roundabouts and intersection improvements at key locations where accidents are happening and congestion is occurring. Our local traffic data revealed that the worst safety and congestion issues exist between Mary Ann Point and Edenvale roads.

Through our conversations with residents across the island, we heard loud and clear that the road should be aligned with the island’s rural character, so Alternative 6 includes safe and connected streets with infrastructure for all road users, including people on foot and on a bike.

These types of improvements, combined with upgrades to Johns Island’s community center, would improve our sense of place, reflect our community values and enhance our quality of life.

Choosing inclusivity over divisiveness, we have engaged County Council members, elected leaders at the city of Charleston, state lawmakers and county staff, and we are finding renewed hope that collaboration can lead to bold improvements. Our plan can be adapted to avoid wetlands, home relocations and trees. Working with County Council and staff, we will keep improving Alternative 6 to ensure that it is the least-destructive and most cost-effective approach.

As we update our design based on recent feedback, we ask County Council to include safety and context-based designs in the project’s stated purpose and need. We can either have a road that looks like Highway 17 cutting through our island’s rural heart or a series of street and traffic upgrades that work together to enhance safety and incorporate localized designs based on a cohesive community vision.

We have the tools to build better roads. Rational Roads is showing that working together every step of the way will help us do just that.

Kate Nevin is a co-founder of Rational Roads for Johns Island and a Johns Island resident.

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10 South Carolina Beaches You Should Visit This Summer

Breathtaking beaches may be found all along the beautiful South Carolina coast. Tourists shall try one of the secret beaches on seldom frequented barrier islands if they want to escape away to their own quiet stretch of heaven. These sandy sanctuaries may be found all along the state's coastline, from SC's southernmost point to North Myrtle Beach, and offer a peaceful location to wander down the beach, look for shells, or...

Breathtaking beaches may be found all along the beautiful South Carolina coast. Tourists shall try one of the secret beaches on seldom frequented barrier islands if they want to escape away to their own quiet stretch of heaven. These sandy sanctuaries may be found all along the state's coastline, from SC's southernmost point to North Myrtle Beach, and offer a peaceful location to wander down the beach, look for shells, or simply soak up the sun. Only accessible by boat, most of the mesmerizing islands have remained undeveloped, preserving the beach in its natural state. Here are the best 10 underrated South Carolina beaches.

Charleston's Barrier Islands

Charleston has evolved to become one of the most popular tourist destinations in the United States, garnering several honors from travel journals. The interesting history, enchanting charm, and tasty gastronomy are all appealing, but tourists can also extend their vacation by a few days to visit some of the greatest beaches in the South. Only 45 minutes to an hour from downtown, the splendid peninsula of Charleston is encircled by barrier islands. There are several beautiful beaches to visit in the area!

Bulls Island

Bulls Island is the biggest of four barrier islands in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, and it stands along with one of the most pristine stretches of shoreline on the east coast. The famous and unique Boneyard Beach, where the remnants of surf-battered trees are sprawled over the sand, is one of its seven miles of beaches. A ferry to the island is available for tourists, as well as a variety of guided excursions such as a Bulls Island sunrise tour, beach drop, kayak trip, and multiday adventure.

Capers Island

Travelers shall visit this state history preserve, located 15 miles (24km) north of Charleston at the southwestern edge of the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, on a picturesque kayak or boat tour. Along with a beautiful beach, they will be able to see a variety of dazzling birds, including endangered brown pelicans and ruddy turnstones. On the island, 294 different kinds of migrating birds have been sighted. Capers Island, like Bulls Island, features a "Boneyard Beach" formed by years of erosion.

Daufuskie Island

The splendid Daufuskie Island, located directly over Calibogue Sound from Hilton Head Island, will make its visitors feel a million miles away from society. It's not uncommon to observe no one when walking along the bewitching white sand beaches. To get to Daufuskie, travelers have to take a boat or water taxi from Hilton Head to Freeport Marina's public pier, then hire a golf cart and drive all the way across the island to the beach. They should not miss out on seeing the astonishing remainder of this remote South Carolina sea island and its numerous wonderful historical monuments while they're there.

Morris Island

This amazing 840-acre deserted island is located at the mouth of Charleston Harbor, across Lighthouse Inlet from Folly Beach, and is known for its historic 19th-century lighthouse. The incredible 150-foot brick structure now remains in the ocean just offshore after years of degradation. The stunning beach, on the other hand, is as lovely as ever, and it's an awesome place to hunt for seashells, especially sand dollars. Morris Island may be visited on a boat or kayak excursion organized by local outfitters.

Folly Beach

Folly Beach, South Carolina, is renowned as the "Edge of America" and is one of Charleston's most beautiful, well-known, and famous beaches. The Washout is a notable surfing area on the island's awesome eastern edge. If tourists continue walking until they reach a cul-de-sac, they may stroll to an abandoned road with hurricane-damaged foundations covered in colorful graffiti. A rookery of pelicans may also be seen where the Atlantic Ocean meets the clear water of Folly River.

Seabrook Island

The magnificent Seabrook Island has been home to soldiers, pirates, and well-to-do Charleston families over the years. The Seabrook Island Club is now a private community with beach access and vacation rentals. The splendid beaches are exclusively available to members and visitors due to the island's setup. The bewitching untouched sand is unlike any other beach in South Carolina. Aside from the beaches, Seabrook Island's tourists may ride their bikes throughout the land. Marsh rabbits, sea turtles, whitetail deer, and alligators are just a few of the fauna worth seeing.

Isle of Palms

The unique Isle of Palms is a high-end destination. Although the beautiful beach is still available to the public, there are several places that are only accessible if visitors stay at a resort or rent a unit. Beach access is available at Isle of Palms County Park, along with expert seasonal lifeguards and a dedicated swimming area for children. An exciting playground and marvelous picnic areas are also available.

The Grand Strand

The astonishing "Grand Strand," which runs between the Little River and Georgetown on the northern coast of South Carolina, is the state's greatest stretch of beautiful beach. The Waccamaw tribe used to live here until Europeans arrived after the American Revolution. Every year, millions of people visit this area, particularly the impressive Myrtle Beach. Unlike several other regions of the state, the Grand Strand has public access to all of its marvelous beaches. Family-friendly attractions are well-known in the area.

Pawleys Island

The tranquil and magical area of Pawleys Island, one of the region's oldest resort areas, is the first stop on the tourist's route north on King's Highway. There are a few fancy golf clubs and resorts on the "mainland" side of town, but visitors cannot access the beach from there. However, if they cross a beautiful little inlet, they will be on the wonderful island itself. They can also visit Otis Beach, which is a popular public beach.

Some Seabrook Island residents call for cap on short-term rentals

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - An ongoing battle over short-term rentals is brewing on Seabrook Island, where homeowners say uncontrolled growth of properties is affecting their quality of life.Homeowners Ted Flerlage and Paul McLaughlin said although they do not want to end short-term rentals on the island, the effects of recent growth have prompted them to call for a cap on short-term rentals.“If you come here in July, around July Fourth, as a resident walking out boardwalk one, let’s say, to north beach, there&rs...

SEABROOK ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - An ongoing battle over short-term rentals is brewing on Seabrook Island, where homeowners say uncontrolled growth of properties is affecting their quality of life.

Homeowners Ted Flerlage and Paul McLaughlin said although they do not want to end short-term rentals on the island, the effects of recent growth have prompted them to call for a cap on short-term rentals.

“If you come here in July, around July Fourth, as a resident walking out boardwalk one, let’s say, to north beach, there’s no space, and that is a rental issue,” Flerlage, who has lived on the island since March 2020, said. “That is a noise issue. It is a parking issue because every spot on the limited parking area is taken.”

The two homeowners have spearheaded the Preserve Seabrook effort. A letter sent to residents as part of the effort says concerns “center on the uncontrolled growth of short-term rentals, especially on streets where there are many full-time and private residential properties.”

“We aim to retain a reasonable offering of properties that can be rented by guests who love to visit and vacation on our beautiful island, while ensuring Seabrook does not gradually morph into a resort community,” the letter states. “We believe adding a cap on the number of resort properties on Seabrook would protect the unique qualities of our island while allowing revenue generated through rental properties to continue to flow back to the town through state and county accommodation taxes that the renters pay.”

Over 300 residents have signed a petition to cap the number of short-term rentals on the island, according to McLaughlin.

The petition seeks a single question on the Nov. 2, 2021 ballot that asks if voters support:

“Seabrook, when I bought here in 2002 and built our house here in 2009, it was more like ‘Cheers,’” McLaughlin said. “Everybody knew your name. Now, with the influx of 500 rental properties and growing, it’s changed a lot, and the quality of life on the island has changed a lot.”

Seabrook Island Mayor John Gregg said a petition from those calling for a cap has been sent to a committee, which will conduct a factual inquiry and then report to town council with recommendations.

“The object for the ad hoc committee was to identify inquiries of factual matters that could inform council as it considers whether or not it is warranted to do further regulation,” Gregg said.

The mayor added that to operate a short-term rental on the island, homeowners need to have a business license and a permit from the town.

McLaughlin and Flerlage said they welcome the data-driven effort but want more communication from the town and to work with them on a solution.

“Our question to them: What is the tipping point? If 500 isn’t the tipping point, is it 600? Is it 700? Is it 800? So, in the meantime, we need to figure it out,” McLaughlin said. “We need to halt what’s going on. Everybody keeps what they currently have, and we study the problem, and we figure out what the solution would be. We don’t make the problem worse while continuing to study it.”

“These are people who live in South Carolina and vote in South Carolina who live on the island and vote on the island,” Flerlage said. “These are the people who are their direct constituents – the people who vote for the mayor and the town council. It’s more than 300 of those people who signed up, which is nearly as many as who voted for them in the last election on Nov. 2, and in our opinion, there has been no communication and we’ve been getting fairly short-tripped on the issue.”

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

South Carolina's Best Beaches, Ranked By Popularity

South Carolina is a stunning place to visit not just for its rich history and mesmerizing landscapes but also for its magnificent beaches. The state's coastline, which stretches for 187 miles along the Atlantic, is home to some of the most splendid and p...

South Carolina is a stunning place to visit not just for its rich history and mesmerizing landscapes but also for its magnificent beaches. The state's coastline, which stretches for 187 miles along the Atlantic, is home to some of the most splendid and pristine beaches in the United States. The Grand Strand includes some of the most dazzling and popular beaches for summer tourists. In addition to all this clear blue wealth, South Carolina also possesses enchanting islands. Here are the 10 most popular beaches in the state.

Kiawah Island

Kiawah Island is characterized by its 10 miles (16 kilometers) of wonderful beaches harmonized by splendid lush marshes, breathtaking white sand, and exceptional maritime forestry. Tourists will enjoy the beautiful water beaches of South Carolina by visiting Kiawah Island, which offers them exciting aquatic activities such as kayaks and SUP rentals. They can also play golf at the resort and satisfy their food cravings at the Bohicket Marina Market.

Coligny Beach Park, Hilton Head Island

The enchanting sea breeze in Coligny Beach will carry all tourists' worries and allow them to explore one of the most popular and astonishing beaches in South Carolina. Visitors can spend time in the spectacular public garden equipped with amazing amenities. It is important to note that the location is the safest beach for children due to the presence of active lifeguards. Around Coligny Plaza, visitors can enjoy tasty food and buy beach accessories and clothing as well as unique souvenirs.

Seabrook Island

Tourists will explore the quiet beaches and spectacular wetlands of Seabrook Island, known for its marvelous and greatest swimming beach in South Carolina. Incredible coastline and beautiful trail rides, a health center with aquatics and fitness, mesmerizing beachfront pools, and a hypnotic deep-water marina are all available on the lovely island. Vacationers do not want to miss the most wonderful sunset seen from Pelican Beach. Moreover, friends and families can gather around mouth-drooling food in award-winning eateries.

Myrtle Beach

In terms of the number of visitors, Myrtle Beach is, without a doubt, the most popular aquatic destination in South Carolina. People from all over the world and the country are attracted by this dazzling beach due to its amazing tourist attractions, various exciting entertainment activities, fancy beachfront resorts, and family-friendliness. Moreover, the emerald blue beach's superb white sand keeps tourists coming back. Those looking for a calmer destination should head toward the North Myrtle Beach coast.

Folly Beach, Charleston

Folly Beach is another beautiful sun location that is easily accessible from Charleston. It has a great fishing pier (fishers shall bring their rod), serving as the ideal scenery for a romantic selfie. The beach is also popular for thrilling outdoor activities such as paddle boarding, surfing, sea kayaking, and dolphin spotting excursions. It's also a wonderful beach to simply wander along while admiring the sights of the splendid ocean.

Front Beach, Isle of Palms

A nice 40-minute journey east of Charleston will take tourists to the Isle of Palms, a lovely coastal spot popular with both locals and visitors of the area. The majority of visitors flock to Front Beach, which is known for its ample public parking and quick beach access. Aside from kayaking, surfing, fishing, paddle boarding, and other aquatic activities, the beach serves as a vital stopover for sea turtles. Therefore, visitors shall watch the warning signs because turtles nest and lay their eggs in the dunes.

Pawleys Island

Travelers looking for the finest place with magnificent sculptures, splendid local plant gardens, and astonishing zoos should visit Pawleys Island's white powdery sand beach. This beach has the most pristine shoreline and is well-known for its calm waves, which are ideal for bicycling, shelling, kayaking, and canoeing with family, friends, and loved ones. Pawleys Island offers a gorgeous view of the area's famed waterway, so tourists shall not miss it!

Huntington Beach State Park — Murrells Inlet

The impressive Huntington Beach State Park is one of South Carolina's most well-known sites. With over 2500 acres of outstanding open area to explore, tourists will enjoy the delightful sea-breeze camping with magical sea waves, charming exotic birds, and bewitching sunsets on the East Coast. Art and environment enthusiasts may see endangered creatures such as loggerhead turtles and flora, as well as visit the neighboring Atalaya Arts and Crafts.

Litchfield Beach

The distinctive Litchfield Beach is another excellent option south of Myrtle Beach. The beach is known to be a quiet destination and is full of charming cottages and a nice 1.5-mile stretch to enjoy. Aside from excellent sunbathing and swimming, people looking for water sports can choose various activities from Jet Skis to sea kayaking, as well as fishing. While parking is limited and it is recommended to arrive early, the fact that only two beach access points are available almost assures a peaceful experience.

Family Beach, Surfside

On Family beach, tourists can stroll with their families down the famed 1.2-mile boardwalk that runs along the magnificent coastline of Surfside Beach and immerse themselves in the awesome landscape while dining, shopping, and participating in exciting festivals. The town provides a variety of coastal activities for people of all ages, including music performances and a water park, as well as excellent dining and shopping. Surfboard rentals and lessons are also available for thrill-seekers. Next:

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