Fencing Companyin Ladson, SC

Let's Talk!

check-circle

Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

check-circle

Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

check-circle

Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

check-circle

Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

check-circle

Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in Ladson. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in Ladson, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-607-2855

Get a Quote

Latest News in Ladson, SC

He caught passes from Trevor Lawrence and was in playoffs. But now Miami’s Ladson is ‘home’

Former Clemson/current University of Miami receiver Frank Ladson will likely be among a rare group of players who by the end of 2022 can say they played for one team, transferred to a program they previously faced, then faced their original team after transferring.“I missed home,’’ said the 6-4, 205-pound Ladson, a fourth-year junior who was rated as high as a five-star prep receiver (PrepStar) and four-star wideout by other major recruiting sites when he played at Homestead South Dade High School. “It was time...

Former Clemson/current University of Miami receiver Frank Ladson will likely be among a rare group of players who by the end of 2022 can say they played for one team, transferred to a program they previously faced, then faced their original team after transferring.

“I missed home,’’ said the 6-4, 205-pound Ladson, a fourth-year junior who was rated as high as a five-star prep receiver (PrepStar) and four-star wideout by other major recruiting sites when he played at Homestead South Dade High School. “It was time to come home.’’

Not only has Ladson caught passes from No. 1 overall NFL Draft pick Trevor Lawrence, he’s now catching passes from projected first-round pick Tyler Van Dyke.

He’s also the second UM transfer receiver in as many years who has competed in the College Football Playoff. Ladson’s Tigers lost to LSU in the Jan. 13, 2020, national championship game following the 2019 season. Though Ladson participated, he didn’t record any stats. After the 2020 season, Ladson’s Tigers lost to Ohio State in a national semifinal. He caught one pass for 9 yards.

Charleston Rambo, who set UM’s single-season school receiving record in 2021 (1,172 yards and seven touchdowns on 79 catches) and is now battling for an NFL spot with the Carolina Panthers, played in the 2019 and 2020 College Football Playoff.

“Some of the guys asked me about it. Like, ‘What’s the biggest game you ever played in? The loudest game you ever played in?’ Ladson said Thursday after the the sixth day of fall camp and first session in full pads. “It’s just a different type of atmosphere. You’re in the playoff [and] you’re playing for a championship. At the end of the game they bring a stage out and confetti falls.”

Ladson, whose Clemson career was marred by consecutive seasons of sports hernia injuries which he said necessitated two surgeries — one on each side — said he’s now healthy, fighting for a starting spot and doing everything he can to become the big-bodied receiver the Hurricanes need.

“I ask Frank questions all the time,’’ said Canes wideout Key’Shawn Smith, another dominant pass-catcher on the outside. “It’s nice to have a big type of receiver like him, because we don’t have that. We got stretch-the-ball or stretch-the-field speed. To have a big receiver like him for the red zone is good to have.’’

Ladson’s transfer marked the third time since 2019 that UM has gotten an elite receiver from the portal. Besides Rambo, the other time was KJ Osborn, now with the Minnesota Vikings, in 2019.

“It’s cool to come home, right?” said ACC Network analyst Eric McClain, a former Clemson offensive lineman who watched practice Thursday. “There’s a bunch of stuff with the transfer portal that I kind of feel bad about, but that’s a good one. There are times when guys just need fresh starts, guys just need to go home.

“I hope and pray he’ll blossom here, because he’s a heck of a player — unbelievable talent.’’

Ladson started four games for Clemson in 2021, tallying four catches for 19 yards before he had to undergo his second surgery. In 2020, Ladson caught 18 passes for 281 yards and three touchdowns in 10 games, four of them starts despite multiple injuries.

“It was kind of like one injury carried over to both years,’’ he said. “It’s great now. It was healed even before I came to Miami [for spring practice]. “ He said it’s been a good experience “learning from a new coach and being around a new group of guys.’’

Ladson was an All-American at South Dade and rated the No. 23 player in USA Today’s “Chosen 25” national high school rankings The 247Sports composite ranking had him as the nation’s No. 7 wideout and 39th best player, regardless of position. He earned his degree in communications at Clemson in three years.

Ladson lauded Miami coach Mario Cristobal and Clemson’s Dabo Swinney. “Great coaches. Both are real big on culture and putting the work in.”

Swinney told the Miami Herald at the ACC media days last month that he was “really proud” of Ladson. “I’m disappointed he wasn’t able to really enjoy the fruits of his labor and talents at Clemson because he was hurt,’’ Swinney said. “But he graduated, a really smart kid. Hopefully he can stay healthy and have the type of year he’s capable of having and wants to have.’’

As for his similarities in Lawrence and Van Dyke, Ladson said they were both students of the game, perfectionists, wanting the best for their teammates and “demanding that from everybody” around them.

He said he appreciated Van Dyke coming into the receivers’ meetings from time to time. “That’s been great. He’s the quarterback. Whatever he wants he gets. It’s like, ‘What you thinking about this route? How do you want me to come out on this?’... Angles, coming out of the route, ball placement, stuff like that.

“I love to get the feedback. The whole room loves it.’’

His goals this season? “Just to win as many games as we can,’’ he said. “Put in the work and everything is going to fall in place.’’

This story was originally published August 11, 2022 3:21 PM.

Groundbreaking Thursday on 'state of the art' mental health facility in Ladson

LADSON, S.C. (WCIV) — Officials with Trident Medical Center are officially breaking ground on a new, standalone behavioral hospital!It will be the first the first freestanding ...

LADSON, S.C. (WCIV) — Officials with Trident Medical Center are officially breaking ground on a new, standalone behavioral hospital!

It will be the first the first freestanding behavioral hospital to open in the Lowcountry in over 30 years.

The nearly 58,790-square-foot facility in Ladson will include a single-story hospital and interior courtyard with space for recreation and therapy. The facility will have “state of the art” inpatient and outpatient services for Lowcountry residents.

The main difference this building will provide in comparison to general hospital care is more of a focus and extended resources for geriatric and adolescent care. The behavioral hospital will continue adult care as well.

The medical director for behavioral health at Trident, Jeffrey Culver, says he starts every day in the emergency room.

Currently, there are only 250 beds for mental health patients in the Lowcountry, and without a dedicated space for them — in most cases — a lot of them must go to the emergency room.

But with the construction of this new facility, Culver hopes it will help provide a safe space for real change and will get more people the help they need.

“I fully expect when this facility opens, that the dialogue both locally and nationally will continue to help chip away at that stigma. I think we're still a long way from where we need to be, where we can talk about mental health and mental illness the same way we talk about things like heart disease and cancer, but we're getting there. And I think being able to open up a brand-new facility and have people see that what we're doing is part of medicine,” Culver said.

ABC News 4's Sean Mahoney spoke with longtime mental health advocate Kelly Troyer, who works with the National Alliance of Mental Illness - Greater Charleston area.

She says the Lowcountry has come a long way in providing mental health services, but that there is still more work to be done and she hopes this will help kickstart that change.

Troyer also says the need for mental health services has drastically increased over the course of the pandemic.

The City of Charleston reported a 78.1 percent increase in the number of suicides from 2020 to 2021.

Troyer also has a personal connection to mental illness, as her son, Alex, was diagnosed with schizophrenia at a young age. She says finding resources in the Lowcountry was nearly impossible in the beginning, as she had to go out of state for care.

However, she says the construction of this new facility is a step in the right direction.

“As far as access to service, no, there's not enough in our state, especially in the rural areas. Then also, even here in the Lowcountry, we have great resources and we have people. But look at the Latino community and the African-American community, there's more [of a ] stigma around mental health conditions, so they don't reach out as much to the access that's here,” Troyer said. “So this groundbreaking of this hospital is very good news for us in our community. And we want to celebrate that.”

The hospital is expected to start out with 60 inpatient beds with the ability to expand and also will provide outpatient resources.

Construction started on the $30.4 million facility started in December, but officials with Trident waited until Thursday to hold the ceremony because of the weather.

Work is expected to wrap up in spring of 2023.

The groundbreaking ceremony and celebration is taking place at 11 a.m., at the construction site, which is about two miles from Trident Medical Center and right off highway 17 in Ladson, at 3445 Ingleside Boulevard.

Dorchester County starts $3 million fire station rebuild

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Dorchester County Fire Station 21 on Ladson Road is now closed while construction begins on a major remodel.The $3.3 million project will see the station completely demolished and reoriented so the building faces the road.Fire Chief Tres Atkinson says the new station is part of the county’s strategy for redeveloping the Oakbrook area. He says the new station will have four bays, office space, living quarters and at least six bunkrooms.“This is a big deal for this area. I think...

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Dorchester County Fire Station 21 on Ladson Road is now closed while construction begins on a major remodel.

The $3.3 million project will see the station completely demolished and reoriented so the building faces the road.

Fire Chief Tres Atkinson says the new station is part of the county’s strategy for redeveloping the Oakbrook area. He says the new station will have four bays, office space, living quarters and at least six bunkrooms.

“This is a big deal for this area. I think not so much for the call volume but just the way this area is growing and the way it looks,” Atkinson said. “We really need to make it fit the ticket for the remodel of the Oakbrook area. We really need to make this more aesthetically pleasing, and I think it’s a win for both sides - for the fire service and for the community as well.”

It will also feature a weight room and a dedicated area for turnout gear. This is a decontamination area to purge gear of harmful chemicals picked up during fire calls. Many of those chemicals are carcinogenic, meaning they can cause to cancer.

The project is currently $300,000 over the original budget with construction expected to be completed sometime next year, although a more specific timeline is not yet available. In the meantime, the fire trucks and ambulances have been moved to other areas.

That has some people living in the area concerned.

“The new station will be great in the long run, but I am just concerned that they were not planning their coverage in the meantime,” said Fred K. “There are numerous apartment buildings being constructed within a half mile from here. How are we going to have the same coverage while this construction is going on?”

Atkinson says they moved the fire engines to Station 22, about four miles away. They transferred EMS services to a Summerville fire station one mile away.

“We worked with our automatic aid partners in Summerville and North Charleston,” Atkinson said. “North Charleston has two stations right close by. . . There really won’t be a big impact to the response times.”

Fred’s concern isn’t about distance so much as it is about traffic.

“I’ve seen EMS have to drive over the concrete medians they put down on Dorchester Road. It’s not too easy for them to get down this way in heavy traffic,” Fred said. “The areas they have to go through are some of the most congested traffic in Dorchester County up here on Ladson Road and Dorchester Road. There’s so much more traffic here than there used to be even from just a few years ago. "

Atkinson says they’ve done the math and can guarantee there will not be a noticeable change in response times.

“We’ll be on scene very quickly,” Atkinson said. “It’ll be a big truck, a big red truck and it might say North Charleston or Summerville or Dorchester County on it but we’ll be there in a timely manner.”

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

This SC pup beat all odds for survival. Now he’s in the running for national hero dog award

Fire danced on the shed walls, sheltering Jake, his siblings and his mother. His mother and siblings escaped unharmed, but a piece of the inflamed ceiling fell on the 3-week-old puppy.Seven years later, Jake the pit bull from Ladson, S.C., is one of the semifinalists for the 2022 American Humane Hero Dog Awards out of 400 candidates from across the country.“When we got him out of the shed, he wasn’t breathing, wasn’t moving. I started doing mouth-to-snout until we got our pet oxygen mask,” said William L...

Fire danced on the shed walls, sheltering Jake, his siblings and his mother. His mother and siblings escaped unharmed, but a piece of the inflamed ceiling fell on the 3-week-old puppy.

Seven years later, Jake the pit bull from Ladson, S.C., is one of the semifinalists for the 2022 American Humane Hero Dog Awards out of 400 candidates from across the country.

“When we got him out of the shed, he wasn’t breathing, wasn’t moving. I started doing mouth-to-snout until we got our pet oxygen mask,” said William Lindler, Jake’s handler and one of the firefighters on the scene of that shed fire in 2015.

Jake was rushed to a local emergency vet’s office by a firetruck in Ladson. Jake began breathing on his own on the trip, but burns marred 75% of his tiny body.

His recovery took about three or four months, and on top of that, the young pit bull’s family abandoned him at the veterinarian’s office.

The office manager of the veterinarian clinic told Lindler that the family had been given options to proceed with Jake’s treatment and were left in the waiting room to fill out some forms.

“About five minutes later, they looked into the waiting room and they were gone,” Lindler said. “And they had just left the clipboard blank with the paperwork on it in the chair in the waiting room.”

After finding out what happened, Lindler automatically decided to adopt the puppy.

Jake followed Lindler to the fire station each day and was eventually sworn in as an Honorary Firefighter and the official mascot. The dog usually went with the team for truck rides and visited schools for fire prevention weeks with his dad.

When Jake wasn’t allowed to ride with the team to calls, things got a little messy. The first year Lindler had him, his wife bought Jake a TempurPedic dog bed for the station. Lindler and his team went out on a call and left Jake at the station because Lindler thought it was too late at night to take the dog along.

When Lindler got back, Jake was found standing on top of the kitchen table, staring at the firefighters with stuffing littered around him.

“It looked like it had snowed in the kitchen because he had totally destroyed that bed,” Lindler laughed. “He was accustomed to going with us on the trucks, but it was about 9 o’clock at night so I just decided to leave him at the station. Well, obviously, he did not like that very much.”

Jake was the star of Ladson’s City Hall and the schools during his three years as an ambassador. Although he had been burned badly, he was always happy to promote the positives and help out with demonstrations.

“The (students) absolutely loved him. I guess they thought it was the neatest thing that there was a puppy that wore a firefighter coat just like us and had a little helmet,” Lindler said.

Jake still carries fame today on social media, which led the American Humane Society to reach out to Lindler about entering Jake into the hero dog contest. His Instagram, “jakethefirepibble,” has more than 23,000 followers as of June 7.

“A couple of his canine buddies have competed in it in years past, and I always thought it was cool when they were doing it, but I never thought about, ‘Could I enter Jake? Should I enter Jake?” Lindler said.

Lindler said he hopes Jake’s story has a positive impact on everyone who’s heard it or has met Jake.

“Everyone has some form of scars, but you shouldn’t let those scars define you,” Lindler said. “(Jake’s injuries) do not slow him down one bit.”

Voting is open to choose the seven finalists in the 2022 American Humane Hero Dog Awards and will close July 22 at 3 p.m.

If you’d like to vote for Jake in the 2022 American Humane Hero Dog Awards and see the other nominees, visit www.herodogawards.org.

Lowcountry Rapid Transit project cost now $625M; feds approve crucial next step

The planned high-speed bus system from Charleston to Ladson known as Lowcountry Rapid Transit has received federal approval to move into the engineering phase, a crucial next step.Meanwhile, the cost estimate for the project has climbed from $360 million just two years ago to $625 million.“I think we’ve all seen prices rise across the board in this inflationary environment,” said Daniel Brock, spokesman for the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments. “As the project progressed, things chan...

The planned high-speed bus system from Charleston to Ladson known as Lowcountry Rapid Transit has received federal approval to move into the engineering phase, a crucial next step.

Meanwhile, the cost estimate for the project has climbed from $360 million just two years ago to $625 million.

“I think we’ve all seen prices rise across the board in this inflationary environment,” said Daniel Brock, spokesman for the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments. “As the project progressed, things changed.”

He said the $625 million estimate includes inflation projected out to 2030 and $145 million for contingencies, and BCD-COG doesn’t think the project will end up costing that much.

The new Federal Transit Administration approval means the council and partners can work on hiring an engineering design company, and have federal authority to pay for engineering work and buy vehicles. The new cost estimate was part of the plan and studies the FTA approved, Brock said.

The transit plan is aimed at relieving commuter traffic on Interstate 26 and is expected to spur development along Rivers Avenue in North Charleston where bus-only lanes would be created.

The more than 21-mile rapid bus system would add needed transit options, particularly in North Charleston, where more than 8 percent of households don’t have a vehicle.

The federal government, it is hoped, would eventually contribute the maximum allowable 60 percent of the project cost, or $375,060,506. The local funding would come from Charleston County’s half-cent sales tax.

“This is the state’s first mass transit infrastructure project, and it is now one important step closer to reality,” Mike Seekings, chairman of the Charleston Area Regional Transit Authority, said in a statement from BCDCOG.

Bus rapid transit systems exist in several other states and are seen as a way to get many of the benefits of a commuter train line without the cost. A BRT line typically involves bus-only lanes, passenger platforms somewhat similar to train stations, and higher speeds and fewer stops than typical city buses.

“The innovative Lowcountry Bus Rapid Transit project has the potential to improve the quality of life and reduce congestion for Charleston and North Charleston,” S.C. Department of Transportation Secretary Christie Hall said in BCDCOG’s announcement.

The process of creating the system has not been rapid and there are still years to go. Studies of transit alternatives to I-26 date back to the mid-2000s when passenger rail was thought to be an option.

Following a two-year engineering phase, and assuming federal approval of full funding, the Lowcountry Rapid Transit system could move to construction and open in 2028, according to BCDCOG.

The engineering phase would complete the final design of the transit system.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
© 2022 Five Star Fence. All rights reserved.
Scroll to top