Fencing Companyin Folly Beach, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in Folly Beach. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in Folly Beach, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in Folly Beach, SC

As Nicole approaches, erosion is the big concern at Folly Beach

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - When Hurricane Ian stormed through the Lowcountry in September, it left Folly Beach’s erosion defenses wiped out, clearing the way for Tropical Storm Nicole to continue the assault on the coastline. The city is now requesting help to restore beach erosion.Residents have come to the beach throughout the day to see the damage as high tides Thursday morning came up all the way to the sand dunes, an area that is normally very dry.“A large concern in that request is the lack of storm protection...

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - When Hurricane Ian stormed through the Lowcountry in September, it left Folly Beach’s erosion defenses wiped out, clearing the way for Tropical Storm Nicole to continue the assault on the coastline. The city is now requesting help to restore beach erosion.

Residents have come to the beach throughout the day to see the damage as high tides Thursday morning came up all the way to the sand dunes, an area that is normally very dry.

“A large concern in that request is the lack of storm protection and flood mitigation in place to buffer from another hurricane,” Nicole Elko, coastal consultant for Folly Beach, said. “Folly Beach has little to no capacity to withstand additional erosion from another storm. Fortunately, the dune system is robust along most of the island and that will help protect the upland infrastructure.”

With a high tide on Thursday of 8.63 feet the Folly River bridge, the effects from Nicole are already visible. The city’s director of public works, Eric Lutz, says between Ian and Nicole, portions of the beach are now completely gone at certain points of the day.

With Nicole, the beach has very little capacity to withstand storms, which means less beach for everyone.

“So now we’re going to be looking at lots of areas on the beach where anywhere it’s not low tide, you won’t have any beach to hang out on,” Lutz said. “There will be variants on that but anywhere, probably east of the washout, is going to be pretty severe so you’ll have beach maybe between half of the cycle between tides.”

Lutz says the amount of beach comes and goes. He says this is not the worst erosion he has ever seen.

Lutz says large concrete slabs, known as groins, were installed on the beach around the Folly Beach Pier back in the 90s. They were designed to catch the sand and create sand dunes. Before the storms, those groins were completely covered by sand except for a few feet of exposed concrete painted yellow. Now the storms have whisked away enough sand to expose 15 feet of concrete.

The city tells me this is a groin placed here in the 90s to help catch sand and build the beach. Before #Ian and #Nicole the only visible part was the yellow tip. There are several other groins like this along the beach. #wx #beach #erosion #chsnews @Live5News https://t.co/sFsPolGq2d

— Nick Reagan (@NickReaganLive5) November 10, 2022

Elko says the city is already in the process of requesting federal emergency rehabilitation assistance from Ian impacts. Lutz says he hopes to get new sand on the beach by 2024.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Folly Beach officials to assess erosion caused by Nicole on Monday

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — Nicole brought rain, choppy waves, and wind to Folly Beach on Thursday.To some, the storm was a surprise."We flew in for the vacation yesterday," said one visitor from New York. "We flew in at 10, and we didn’t know there was a tropical storm, so we made the best of it in Charleston."Come Friday morning, it was business as usual.Construction continued on the Folly Pier, with crews hoping to stay on time and have the new pier open by the spring of 2023....

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — Nicole brought rain, choppy waves, and wind to Folly Beach on Thursday.

To some, the storm was a surprise.

"We flew in for the vacation yesterday," said one visitor from New York. "We flew in at 10, and we didn’t know there was a tropical storm, so we made the best of it in Charleston."

Come Friday morning, it was business as usual.

Construction continued on the Folly Pier, with crews hoping to stay on time and have the new pier open by the spring of 2023.

While there was no significant damage to any buildings, Mayor Tim Goodwin said there is significant beach erosion.

The mayor said that erosion will be surveyed on Monday because of the holiday on Friday.

"There’s definitely been more erosion and change in the dunes, especially since we have been here over the last few weeks," said Leah Sin, who is visiting from North Carolina. "We have come out at high tide and low tide all the time."

Sin and her kids, Remy and Sully, were checking out the beach after the storm. They have been staying at Folly for the last few weeks.

"We were already here and – it was a little unexpected. We weren't sure how to navigate it, because we don’t deal with a lot of storms," said Sin.

Some people on the beach were walking, others enjoying a cup of coffee. But most were just taking in the views.

A few surfers caught some waves, and one lifeguard we caught up with was going for a swim.

"It wasn’t my intention to swim, but I had to check it out," said one vacationer. "It was a little bit rough out there. Not so much that it will pull you out."

The storm definitely did not ruin the vacation for the people we spoke with.

"This is a dream come true. This is our favorite place," said Sin.

"With my string of luck, this is my second tropical storm on my second vacation this year. So, you have to make the best of it," said another vacationer.

City of Folly Beach asking for public comment on proposed parking plan

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - The city of Folly Beach is asking for public comment on its new proposed parking plan.The proposed plan is looking to bring both paid and free parking to the area. They are submitting the plan to the South Carolina Department of Transportation Saturday and are encouraging residents to share their opinions beforehand.According to the c...

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCSC) - The city of Folly Beach is asking for public comment on its new proposed parking plan.

The proposed plan is looking to bring both paid and free parking to the area. They are submitting the plan to the South Carolina Department of Transportation Saturday and are encouraging residents to share their opinions beforehand.

According to the city, the new proposal adds 131 paid parking spaces along the front beach, bringing the new total of paid parking spaces to 33% of all front beach spaces.

They plan to add paid parking spaces along Artic Avenue and up numbered streets. They are also planning to add free parking along Ashley Avenue, on top of the free parking that already exists on the street.

The city said the plan was developed with the goal of giving residents and visitors equal opportunity to prime parking. For each paid parking space proposed, two additional free spots were created, according to the city.

However, it appears not everyone is on board with the proposal.

The Charleston Beach Foundation released a response to the plan objecting to the increase in paid parking.

They also challenged the claim that only 33% of the parking is paid for, claiming that some of the free spaces included in the equation are blocked by debris, ditches, or other encroachments.

“Many spots that they’re claiming you can park, you can’t fit a car there. Not to mention... If you go to the beach here as an older person, or with a family, or whatever, it’s about a mile walk to get to any sort of facilities,” Tim Jump, who provided research to the Beach Foundation, said.

He’s a frequent surfer on Folly and said he believes that the beach, like the rest of nature, should be free to everyone.

In a statement, the city’s mayor said:

“The free and paid parking space counts shown on the plan are based on a physical inventory of spaces within the DOT right of way. The number of free spaces does not include obstructed areas. The scale of the map does not lend itself to a space-by-space demarcation on each block. However, the actual count of spaces within the areas marked as free parking was conducted in person and does not include areas where a vehicle cannot be parked. The count of free parking spaces also does not include spaces located on County property at the County Park and Folly Pier. Alternatively, the beachfront parking lots that are shown on the map are for reference only. They are outside of the DOT right of way and were not included in the tally of paid parking spaces.”

Comments will be accepted until this Saturday. The city said all comments should be emailed to comments@follybeach.gov.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

One of the deadliest animals in SC might attack without warning. What to know

They are aggressive, will eat anything they see and cruise the shallow, warm water close to the coastline.They are bull sharks, and they are one of South Carolina’s deadliest animals, according to ...

They are aggressive, will eat anything they see and cruise the shallow, warm water close to the coastline.

They are bull sharks, and they are one of South Carolina’s deadliest animals, according to Femanin, which bills itself as a website written by women for women.

“The bull shark is one of the most dangerous of all sharks, as it may attack with no warning out of confusion or fear,” the website said.

Here’s what National Geographic says about this predator: “Historically, they are joined by their more famous cousins, great whites and tiger sharks, as the three species most likely to attack humans.”

And they’re known to swim far inland into rivers and tributaries.

EEK.

They prefer fish, dolphins, other sharks over humans. But get this, often when they attack people it’s a mistake or curiosity.

Curiosity?

The website AZ Animals says bull sharks are common in South Carolina but attacks have taken place at Burkes Beach at Hilton Head, Folly Beach and Debordieu Beach.

While the bull shark may be the most deadly, death is not all that common and neither are attacks.

The International Shark Attack File from the Florida Museum of Natural History has recorded 111 shark attacks between 1837 and 2021. That’s the fourth most in the United States after Florida, Hawaii and California.

But last year was an outlier. The annual report listed 73 unprovoked bites in the U.S., 39 worldwide last year and nine deaths.

Sharks were also the deadliest animal in North Carolina, Femanin found.

Overall among the states, snakes were listed as deadliest. Thirteen states, from Florida to Michigan to Oregon, found any number of rattlesnakes, copperheads and water moccasins to cause the most deaths.

Residents of four states were listed as being threatened by bears — grizzly in Wyoming, polar in Alaska, brown in Arkansas and black in Vermont.

Then there’s the kissing bug in Delaware.

“Sadly, this critter is actually a lot more dangerous than it sounds,” Femanin said.

The description alone is enough to scare you.

“Kissing bugs tend to bite faces and are particularly active at night,” the website said. “If you do get bit, you might develop a disease that can cause cardiac problems.”

Texas has its own problem. Not really an animal but Femanin said it deserves to be on the list: amoebas.

It’s a tiny organism that lives in the water.

“If they get into your body (generally through your nose), they can start eating through your brain tissue,” the website said.

This story was originally published November 17, 2022 5:00 AM.

In Florida, life’s a beach, but should it be if we keep making the same mistakes? | Opinion

Editorials and other Opinion content offer perspectives on issues important to our community and are independent from the work of our newsroom reporters.On an island a few miles south of Charleston, South Carolina, you’ll find the funky little seaside town of Folly Beach. Its resident population of about 2,200 is seasonally augmented by hordes of tourists seeking a place to swim, surf and drink.Florida has several similar beach communities, but it does not have a Folly Beach. On the other hand, Florida’s lengthy coa...

Editorials and other Opinion content offer perspectives on issues important to our community and are independent from the work of our newsroom reporters.

On an island a few miles south of Charleston, South Carolina, you’ll find the funky little seaside town of Folly Beach. Its resident population of about 2,200 is seasonally augmented by hordes of tourists seeking a place to swim, surf and drink.

Florida has several similar beach communities, but it does not have a Folly Beach. On the other hand, Florida’s lengthy coastline features miles of what could aptly be called “beach folly.”

“Beach folly” can be defined as “building — or repeatedly rebuilding — structures atop the shifting sands of a beach that’s susceptible to erosion and storm surges now and to sea-level rise in the future.”

This year’s hurricane season delivered reminders of beach folly in the state. In late September, Hurricane Ian’s storm surge swept over barrier islands off Florida’s lower Gulf Coast. Ian was blamed for 137 deaths in the state, and the combined property damage on the islands and mainland exceeded $50 billion.

Then, on Nov. 10, Hurricane Nicole came ashore along Florida’s Atlantic Coast. Severe erosion destroyed several dozen single-family homes and left some beaches needing yet another renourishment at the taxpayers’ expense.

Moreover, as the Associated Press reported, “In Daytona Beach Shores and New Smyrna Beach, two dozen multistory condo buildings have been evacuated and deemed unsafe by building inspectors.”

Unsafe multistory condos? Sounds all too familiar. The June 21, 2021, collapse of the 12-story Champlain Towers South in Surfside tragically brought overdue attention to the risks of neglecting maintenance on buildings next to a briny ocean that can cause serious corrosion as well as dangerous erosion of structures’ underpinnings.

Granted, there’s no need for panic. Most of Florida’s oceanfront buildings have been inspected and deemed safe, while the unsafe ones were evacuated. That’s perhaps the only blessing from the tragedy in Surfside.

Meanwhile, in the Florida Panhandle, the Panama City News-Herald reports that in Mexico Beach, only about 40% of the town has been rebuilt after Hurricane Michael destroyed 85% of its structures four years ago. Four years ago!

This raises a question: Should all damaged or destroyed beachfront structures even be replaced? Is there an alternative that would benefit the public as well as Florida’s troubled property insurance marketplace?

Perhaps. Many of Florida’s beaches are on barrier islands bisected by roads such as Highway A1A. Along much of the coast there are structures on both sides of the road, with relatively few places for inland residents to access the beach.

The recent storm damage presents a renewed opportunity to alleviate this problem by giving the owners of damaged beachfront properties an alternative to rebuilding in the same spot. Instead, state and local governments could partner to tender offers to buy up selected properties in order to expand public access to the beaches.

Beach access was already a concern in many areas because some beach towns severely restrict parking. Beach access was dealt another blow four years ago when Gov. Rick Scott signed House Bill 631.

As reported in FlaglerLive.com, “The new law allows beachfront property owners — hotels, residential dwellings, or others — to restrict access to the ‘dry sand’ area of the beach, or that area above the average high-tide waterline.

“In effect, that means beachgoers used to lounging, jogging, taking walks or playing in those dry sands could legally be barred from doing so unless they’re, say, guests at the hotel or friends of the property owner.”

Sounds harsh. Then again, if you owned a lakefront home in Kendall or Pembroke Pines, you might not want a group of strangers partying in your back yard amid the “gifts” left behind by the iguanas and the ducks.

Bottom line: If there are owners of damaged beachfront property who are willing to sell at a reasonable price, take them up on it because placing more ocean frontage under public ownership could help with the beach-access problem.

It also might marginally reduce some of the huge financial risks assumed by Florida’s property insurer of last resort, Citizens Property Insurance Corporation, and by the federal government’s National Flood Insurance Program.

However, as sensible as this approach seems, there are trade-offs. When the government acquires private property, that property moves off the tax rolls and onto the expense side of the ledger.

Even so, it should be noted that buildings need not be directly on a beach to be a big provider of tax revenue. Indeed, some of Florida’s most valuable properties lie across from a beach on the other side of a road. The buildings on Miami Beach’s Ocean Drive, from Fifth to 15th streets are prime examples.

Nonetheless, shifting beachfront property from taxpaying to tax-consuming can be problematic in some areas. In the Panhandle, for instance, tax revenue derived from the pricey beachfront condos, hotels and McMansions helps to fund government services in counties that otherwise have a high level of poverty.

Moreover, government-owned beaches typically incur operating costs for cleaning, maintenance, law enforcement, insurance and staffing the prime swimming areas with lifeguards.

So while Ian and Nicole have given the Florida Legislature a rare opportunity to make selective improvements on several fronts, from storm readiness and beach access to property insurance, it is not time — yet — to yell, “Clear the isles!”

Robert F. Sanchez, of Tallahassee, is a former member of the Miami Herald Editorial Board. He writes for the Herald’s conservative opinion newsletter, Right to the Point. It’s weekly, and it’s free. To subscribe, go to miamiherald.com/righttothepoint.

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