Fencing Companyin Kiawah Island, SC

Let's Talk!

check-circle

Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

check-circle

Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

check-circle

Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

check-circle

Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

check-circle

Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in Kiawah Island. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in Kiawah Island, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-607-2855

Get a Quote

Latest News in Kiawah Island, SC

The Best Golf Courses in South Carolina

From the Lowcountry to the Upstate, these are some of the best South Carolina golf courses. South Carolina is home to more than 350 ...

From the Lowcountry to the Upstate, these are some of the best South Carolina golf courses.

South Carolina is home to more than 350 golf courses, including many impressive public courses along with resorts and private courses. The state is a favorite for vacations planned around the game for the exceptional quality of the courses and the convenience of playing several courses located in the same area.

Myrtle Beach claims the title of “Golf Capital of the World” with more than 80 courses within just a few miles. Hilton Head Island’s more than 23 championship courses include oceanfront layouts as well as parkland and links-style courses. Charleston and Bluffton are also home to a number of popular courses created by top golf course architects attracted by South Carolina’s weather, natural beauty, and great beaches.

In addition to golf, visitors enjoy southern hospitality, great food, and spectacular landscapes and wildlife. These are some of the best golf courses in South Carolina.

Harbour Town Golf Links, Hilton Head Island

Located at Sea Pines Resort, Harbour Town Golf Links is home to the annual RBC Heritage PGA TOUR event. Famed golf course designer Pete Dye, along with Jack Nicklaus, created a beautiful course with small sloping greens, water hazards, challenging par threes, and a widely recognizable 18th hole known for its lighthouse view. Heron Point by Pete Dye and Atlantic Dunes by Davis Love III are also at Sea Pines Resort.

May River Golf Club, Palmetto Bluff

Designed by Jack Nicklaus, May River Golf Club is located at the Montage Palmetto Bluff. The challenging course plays along the banks of the river among ancient live oak trees and beautiful Lowcountry landscapes with wide sloping fairways, white-sand bunkers, and water hazards. The course has earned Certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary status for its wildlife and habitat management.

Haig Point, Daufuskie Island

This Rees Jones-designed course features 29 holes, including the nine-hole Osprey Course and the 20-hole Signature Course with routing options for both skilled and recreational golfers. Ocean views, tree-lined fairways, and abundant wildlife make playing the courses memorable. The private course, reached only by boat, offers tee times for a limited number of daily guests.

The Ocean Course, Kiawah Island

This Pete Dye design — created with input from his wife, Alice — features ten seaside holes along the Atlantic Ocean on the easternmost end of the island. The elevation of the course, as suggested by Alice Dye, provides views of Kiawah’s coastline from every hole while placing the course in the midst of ocean breezes, adding challenge and gorgeous scenery. Four other courses at Kiawah Island include Osprey Point by Tom Fazio, Oak Point by Clyde Johnston, Turtle Point by Jack Nicklaus, and Cougar Point by Gary Player.

TPC Myrtle Beach, Murrells Inlet

This public course designed by Tom Fazio features abundant live oaks, pines, wetlands, and a scenic layout. Narrow fairways and sloping greens challenge golfers, and its signature par-five 18th hole offers a stunning view along with a water hazard surrounding the green.

True Blue Golf Club, Pawleys Island

This Mike Strantz signature golf course has vast tree-lined fairways, elevation changes, large bunker areas, and water hazards. Its Lowcountry site includes wetlands, forests, and salt marshes. Located at the True Blue Golf Resort, the course features an 18-acre practice facility. Nearby Caledonia Golf & Fish Club has another popular Mike Strantz design.

Wild Dunes Resort, Isle of Palms

Two world-class golf courses, both designed by Tom Fazio, are offered at Wild Dunes. The Links Course features narrow palm-lined fairways and a memorable finishing hole that overlooks the Atlantic Ocean. The Harbor Course, known for its challenging design and views of the Intracoastal Waterway and salt marshes, tests golfers with plenty of water hazards.

Barefoot Resort & Golf, North Myrtle Beach

Four different courses, all designed by leading professionals, are offered at the resort. The Norman Course by Greg Norman includes seven holes along the Intracoastal Waterway, undulating greens, and desert-style natural vegetation. Other courses include the Love Course (designed by Davis Love III), the Fazio Course (by Tom Fazio), and semi-private Dye Course (by Pete Dye).

Tidewater Golf Club, North Myrtle Beach

Set between the Intracoastal Waterway and Cherry Grove Inlet, the course offers gorgeous scenery along with its challenges. Nine holes play along the water, and the saltwater marsh and dense trees put players to the test, as do elevation changes and ocean breezes.

Daniel Island Club, Charleston

This residential development and private club features two of South Carolina’s most beautiful courses: Beresford Creek by Tom Fazio and Ralston Creek by Rees Jones. The Fazio-designed course is set among waterways, marshes, creeks, and massive trees, offering stunning views. Ralston Creek’s fairway and greenside bunkers, along with contoured greens and water features, present beautiful views along with multiple challenges.

Furman Golf Club, Greenville

One of the top college golf courses in the country, this public course is located on the campus of Furman University. Nearby, the highly-rated Walker Course at Clemson University is set on the banks of Lake Hartwell near the center of the campus.

10 South Carolina Beaches Worth Visiting In The Winter (Over Summer)

South Carolina is known for its miles of spectacular coastline and parade of beach town destinations that are perfect for summer getaways. However, once the temperatures drop and the hordes of summer crowds depart, these beautiful beaches transform into off-season retreats that still offer intrepid travelers plenty to see, do, and experience. The following are some of SC’s absolute best beaches for the ultimate idyllic winte...

South Carolina is known for its miles of spectacular coastline and parade of beach town destinations that are perfect for summer getaways. However, once the temperatures drop and the hordes of summer crowds depart, these beautiful beaches transform into off-season retreats that still offer intrepid travelers plenty to see, do, and experience. The following are some of SC’s absolute best beaches for the ultimate idyllic winter vacation full of sun, sand, and off-season adventure.

Hilton Head

Known as “America’s Favorite Island,” Hilton Head is so much more than one of South Carolina’s most visited summer beach towns; it’s also a lovely escape in the off-season for those looking for year-round beachy vibes. And with an average daytime temperature in the low-to-mid 60s, the weather is just balmy enough to still enjoy (most) of HH’s most popular outdoor activities—without the summer crowds.

Folly Beach

The popular Folly Beach is just minutes from downtown Charleston, making it an ideal spot to take a winter break. Temperatures in the 60s throughout make for cooler days that are still perfect for Low Country exploring, while nearby Charleston has a number of fun winter activities that are just a stone’s throw away from Folly Beach’s laidback vibes and picturesque beauty.

Myrtle Beach

Myrtle Beach is undoubtedly one of South Carolina’s top-rated beaches throughout the summer—but in the off-season, the beautiful beach town is still a bustling hub of activities and events that make it a wow-worthy winter destination, too. And while it may be too cool to take a dip, MB’s outdoor scenery is just as lovely as it is in the summer.

Kiawah Island

Kiawah Island is a secluded beach town escape whose year-round laidback vibes make it the perfect place to visit in winter’s cooler months. Undoubtedly, one of the best reasons to visit Kiawah is its relaxing atmosphere—made even better by the lack of summer crowds—but there are still plenty of outdoor activities and recreation on tap for outdoor enthusiasts, too.

Isle Of Palms

Isle of Palms may be known for its stellar summer recreation; however, this Charleston area beach is so much more than a warm weather retreat. Throughout the off-season, this picturesque SC beach’s tranquil (and mostly crowd-free!) vibes become the perfect getaway for those looking for a beachfront vacay with plenty to see and do during the cool(er) winter months.

Sullivan’s Island

A neighbor to Isle of Palms located at the mouth of the lovely Charleston harbor, Sullivan’s Island is the perfect mix of small-town charm and relaxing, beachside fun. Home to beautiful beaches, outdoor adventures, and nearby activities galore, Sullivan’s Island is the perfect winter getaway.

Pawley’s Island

Known as one of America’s oldest and best summer resort communities, Pawley’s Island may seem like an exclusively warm weather destination. However, when the summer crowds leave, there are still plenty of things to see and do in this historic SC beach town.

Murrells Inlet

A popular fishing village near Myrtle Beach, Murrells Inlet is packed with charm, history, and wonderful waterfront scenery that make it a gorgeous year-round getaway. From pirate lore to oodles of outdoor recreation, SC’s “seafood capital” is a fun-filled winter retreat.

Litchfield Beach

Well known for its pristine white sand and turquoise waters that make for an idyllic summer retreat, Litchfield Beach is no less beautiful during the cool(er) winter months. Come for the activities like fishing and biking, but stay for the relaxing, scenic vibes available year-round.

Surfside Beach

Located near Myrtle Beach, the spectacularly scenic Surfside Beach is known as a popular family-friendly destination throughout the summer. However, there’s plenty to do here during the off-season, too, for those looking to escape the warm weather crowds.

5 SC golf courses among the 100 best in the US, new GOLF magazine ranking shows. Here’s why

Recently, GOLF Magazine released a list of their picks for the 2022-2023 “Top 100 Courses in the U.S.” Five of these golf courses were in South Carolina.Selected first out of the courses chosen from the Palmetto State was the Kiawah Island (Ocean) course, which was ranked 32nd.Designed by Pete Dye an...

Recently, GOLF Magazine released a list of their picks for the 2022-2023 “Top 100 Courses in the U.S.” Five of these golf courses were in South Carolina.

Selected first out of the courses chosen from the Palmetto State was the Kiawah Island (Ocean) course, which was ranked 32nd.

Designed by Pete Dye and built in 1991, The Ocean Course on Kiawah Island was described as “one of the South’s most memorable playing experiences,” by the magazine.

Last year, the 2021 PGA Championship was held at The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island Golf Resort.

Next on the list of South Carolina courses and ranked in 44th place was Yeamans Hall in Hanahan. Designed by Seth Raynor and built in 1925, this course can be found in Berkeley County. This course combined “classic Seth Raynor design with coastal South Carolina topography.” Over the decades, the course began to fade, but a two decade-long renovation based on Raynor’s original property maps, which were discovered in the clubhouse attic, returned the course to its original beauty, GOLF magazine states.

Ranked 63rd, Harbour Town Golf Links jumped 10 spaces from its ranking last year. This Hilton Head Island golf course was built in 1969 and was designed by Pete Dye and Jack Nicklaus. This course sits at the island’s south end and has been the yearly venture for the RBC Heritage tournament each spring. “Even 50+ years after the course opened, Harbour Town’s exemplar holes remain as compelling and interesting as anything modern architecture has to offer,” described the magazine.

This course is known not for its length but rather for its need for accuracy and “precise iron play” to help golfers get their shots around the live oak and pine trees scattered around the course.

In 85th place, the Congaree Golf Club, found in Ridgeland, made the list. This newer course was designed by Tom Fazio and was built in 2017. Various tournaments take place at Congaree and, regardless of its younger age, has garnered much attention for its beauty, design and playability by golfers.

Lastly, in 99th place, Palmetto Golf Club in Aiken made GOLF magazine’s list. This course is the oldest out of the South Carolina golf courses on this list and one of the oldest in the magazine’s pick of 100. Founded in 1892 by Thomas Hitchcock, Palmetto Golf Club has several contending holes in which to call your favorite.

“Each green is so good, and no surprise why: Alister MacKenzie lent a hand to them when he was working in neighboring Augusta,” wrote GOLF magazine.

This story was originally published November 15, 2022 8:00 AM.

SC finishes sea turtle nesting season with record-breaking inventory

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are ...

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.

Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.

Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.

For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.

As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are optimistic the reptiles are beginning to recover.

“Increased nest counts since the mid- to late-2000s show promise for the loggerhead,” said Michelle Pate, nesting program leader for DNR. “We’re seeing the continued benefits of conservation measured enacted decades ago as well as those management techniques still used today.”

Among the most interesting finds this season was the oddity of a leucistic sea turtle on Folly Beach. While most loggerhead turtles are dark, leucistic animals are white, pale or patchy in color because of their reduced pigmentation.

Dave Miller, the permit holder for the Folly Beach Turtle Team, found the special turtle in September.

“I saw these two turtles coming out of the nest and they were covered with sand,” Miller said. “And then the wave washed them over and one of them was white. I didn’t realize it when it was covered in sand.”

Leucism increases animals’ chances of being taken by predators. And in areas like Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island, coyotes are among the top predators for sea turtles.

Turtle patrol volunteers work to find sea turtle nests on beaches before coyotes do.

“What the Wild Dunes coyotes have learned to do is ambush the turtle as she comes out of the water in the middle of the night and begins to lay her eggs,” said Mary Pringle, a project leader for the Island Turtle Team in Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island.

The coyotes will often eat the turtle’s eggs before volunteers can get to them in the morning and place plastic screens over the nests. The animals can’t destroy the nests once that happens. But volunteers can’t predict when and where a turtle will choose to nest.

“When I started (volunteering), we didn’t have any coyotes,” Pringle said. “We had raccoons and ghost crabs as predators, but not coyotes. And it’s just something that’s happening all over the coast.”

Foxes and the emergence of armadillos on beaches have also become a reason for nest losses in the state.

Pate said other concerns include artificial lighting on heavily populated beaches, and people intercepting nesting females at night.

Even with predators like coyotes, sea turtle species in the state have found a way to prevail. Many new turtles nested here for the first time this season.

“And they (scientists) are cautiously optimistic that it will continue because of nest protection efforts — saving nests, making sure they hatch like we did and all the other people who do the same thing that we do for DNR,” Pringle said.

Pringle’s Island Turtle Team is one of about 30 groups along the coast that patrol beaches from May 1 to Oct. 31 to count, monitor and protect the nests. DNR said there are more than 1,500 volunteers coastwide.

Fifty-seven total nests were spotted this year on the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. And 4,602 turtles hatched on those islands.

Most of the nests there were in the Wild Dunes area.

Thirty-four nests were were counted on Myrtle Beach; 99 on Folly Beach; 483 on Kiawah Island; 351 at Edisto Beach State Park; and 423 on Hilton Head Island, according to data.

Loggerheads nest on the state’s shores more often than any other species, but greens, Kemp’s ridleys and leatherbacks also have a presence here.

Each species is classified as endangered or threatened and receive protections under the Endangered Species Acts. Extra state protections are also in place.

This year, 7,974 nests were counted in the state, 21 green turtle nests and one Kemp’s ridley nest.

Green turtles and Kemp’s ridleys are primarily found in other regions of North America, including Florida and the western Gulf of Mexico.

“I think in the history of Folly Beach Turtle Team, we’ve had maybe two leatherbacks,” Miller said. “And everything else has been loggerheads.”

Other species will pop up on the beach, maybe for food, but choose to nest in other locations.

DNR said beachgoers can help the state’s sea turtles by keeping beaches clean, giving the animals and their nests space and turning beachfront lights out to avoid disorienting them during nesting season.

Exchange Club Of Kiawah-Seabrook Awards Grants To Island Nonprofits

By Thad Peterson for The Island ConnectionEach year, the Exchange Club of Kiawah-Seabrook awards grants to organizations in the Lowcountry whose mission is to help the citizens of Johns and Wadmalaw Island. This year’s award ceremony, held Nov. 2 at the Seabrook Island Club, was a celebration of the great work being done by these organizations for the community. Recipient organizations are identified by Club member committees in five categories and organizations are vetted in detail, and in many cases...

By Thad Peterson for The Island Connection

  • Each year, the Exchange Club of Kiawah-Seabrook awards grants to organizations in the Lowcountry whose mission is to help the citizens of Johns and Wadmalaw Island. This year’s award ceremony, held Nov. 2 at the Seabrook Island Club, was a celebration of the great work being done by these organizations for the community. Recipient organizations are identified by Club member committees in five categories and organizations are vetted in detail, and in many cases Club members conduct on-site visits with the organizations prior to making the awards. It’s not unusual for the relationship between the organizations and Club members to extend beyond the grant, with Club members providing counsel and serving on the boards of various organizations. Since the program was launched, the Club has granted more than $2.5 million to organizations supporting Johns and Wadmalaw Island. Representatives from recipient organizations attended the event and were recognized for the significant contribution that they make to the quality of life on Johns and Wadmalaw Island. The Exchange Club of Kiawah-Seabrook is a service organization committed to community enrichment through the support and development of programs which focus upon the prevention of child abuse, youth development and education, Americanism, and community outreach.

    The Club holds dinner meetings about every two weeks, providing an opportunity for fellowship and fun, along with a guest speaker discussing some aspects of life in the Lowcountry. Other activities include an annual holiday event and excursions to the Charleston Symphony throughout the year.

    THE FOLLOWING ARE THIS YEAR’S AWARD RECIPIENTS FOR EACH CATEGORY:

    Community Service/ Hunger and Mentoring

    • Backpack Buddies

    • Blessings Basket

    • Meals on Wheels

    • Sea Island Cares

    • Sweetgrass Garden Co-op

    • New Webster Food Pantry

    • Fields to Families

    • Hebron-Zion Food Pantry

    • Hebron-Zion Senior Citizens

    • AMOR Kitchen

    • St. James Bethel AME Sunday Dinner

    Health and Housing

    • Barrier Islands Free Medical Clinic

    • Paraclete Foundation

    • Habitat for Humanity

    • Water Wellness Mission

    Child Abuse/Prevention

    • Dee Norton Advocacy Center

    • Florence Crittenton Programs of SC

    • Low Country Orphan Relief (LOR)

    • HALOS

    Youth and Education

    • Angel Oak Elementary School

    • Camp Happy Days

    • Camp Hi Hopes

    • Charleston Collegiate School

    • Community and Schools

    • CSO Education

    • Edith Frierson Elementary School

    • Haut Gap Middle School

    • Mt. Zion Elementary School

    • Youth of the Month

    • High School Scholarships

    Americanism

    • Friends of the Fisher House

    • Seabrook Island Veterans Day Golf Outing

    If you are interested in learning more about us, please fill out a membership application form at ecks.memberclicks.net/ or contact Bob Leggett at rmlegg8@gmail.com.

    Disclaimer:

    This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
    © 2022 Five Star Fence. All rights reserved.
    Scroll to top