Fencing Companyin Ridgeville, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in Ridgeville. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in Ridgeville, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in Ridgeville, SC

Gov. Henry McMaster, Lt. Gov. Pamela S. Evette, and First Lady Peggy McMaster’s Weekly Schedule: October 17, 2022

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Governor Henry McMaster, Lieutenant Governor Pamela S. Evette, and First Lady Peggy McMaster's schedules for the week of October 17 will include the following:Monday, October 17 at 9:45 AM: Lt. Gov. Evette will attend the 25th Annual Fire Investigative Approaches Training Seminar hosted by the NC/SC Chapters of the International Association of Arson Investigators, Kingston Plantation Course, Brighton Tower, 8560 Queens Way Boulevard, Myrtle Beach, S.C.Monday, October 17 at 11:00 AM: Gov. ...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Governor Henry McMaster, Lieutenant Governor Pamela S. Evette, and First Lady Peggy McMaster's schedules for the week of October 17 will include the following:

Monday, October 17 at 9:45 AM: Lt. Gov. Evette will attend the 25th Annual Fire Investigative Approaches Training Seminar hosted by the NC/SC Chapters of the International Association of Arson Investigators, Kingston Plantation Course, Brighton Tower, 8560 Queens Way Boulevard, Myrtle Beach, S.C.

Monday, October 17 at 11:00 AM: Gov. McMaster will attend the Propeller Club State of the Port Luncheon, Charleston Marriott, 170 Lockwood Drive, Charleston, S.C

Monday, October 17 at 12:05 PM: Lt. Gov. Evette will visit and tour Carolina Foods, 3671 Ralph Ellis Boulevard, Loris, S.C.

Monday, October 17 at 2:30 PM: Gov. McMaster will attend the groundbreaking of the Navy Base Intermodal Facility, North Hobson Avenue, North Charleston, S.C.

Tuesday, October 18 at 10:30 AM: Gov. McMaster will attend the ribbon cutting of E.A. Sween, 5740 Highway 25 North, Hodges, S.C.

Tuesday, October 18 at 4:00 PM: Gov. McMaster will oversee a State Fiscal Accountability Authority (SFAA) meeting, Room 252, Edgar Brown Building, State House grounds, 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, S.C.

Wednesday, October 19 at 11:00 AM: Gov. McMaster and Lt. Gov. Evette will attend an announcement event at BMW, 1400 SC-101, Greer, S.C.

Thursday, October 20 at 9:30 AM: Gov. McMaster will attend the Groundbreaking for Patriots Annex in Mt. Pleasant hosted by Patriots Point Development and Bennett Hospitality, Patriots Point, 40 Patriots Point Road, Mt. Pleasant, S.C.

Thursday, October 20 at 11:00 AM: Lt. Gov. Evette will attend the grand opening of Innovative Construction Group, 2570 Florence Harllee Boulevard., Florence, S.C.

Thursday, October 20 at 1:00 PM: Gov. McMaster will attend the PGA Tour’s The CJ Cup, Congaree Golf Club, 384 Davant Drive, Ridgeland, S.C.

Sunday, October 23 at 5:30 PM: Gov. McMaster will attend and participate in the closing ceremonies for the PGA Tour’s The CJ Cup, Congaree Golf Club, 384 Davant Drive, Ridgeland, S.C.

Gov. Henry McMaster’s Weekly Schedule: October 10, 2022

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Gov. Henry McMaster’s schedule for the week of October 10, 2022, included:

Monday, October 10

Gov. McMaster was in the Office of the Governor for office hours, State House, 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, S.C.

1:00 PM: Policy meeting.

2:00 PM: Gov. McMaster addressed the Teacher Recruitment and Retention Taskforce Meeting, Room 110, Blatt Building, State House complex, 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, S.C.

Tuesday, October 11

10:30 AM: Gov.. McMaster and SCDOT Secretary Christy Hall joined by members of the S.C. General Assembly and South Carolina business leaders participated in a project kickoff event for the I-26 widening project between Charleston and Columbia, 1185 Cypress Campground Road, Ridgeville, S.C.

11:35 AM: Call with a local official.

Noon: Gov. McMaster was the keynote speaker at the Greater Summerville/Dorchester County Chamber of Commerce 2022 Legislative Luncheon, Summerville Country Club, 400 Country Club Boulevard, Summerville, S.C.

Gov. McMaster was in the Office of the Governor for office hours, State House, 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, S.C.

3:45 PM: Economic development meeting.

4:30 PM: Agency meeting.

Wednesday, October 12

10:45 AM: Tourism meeting.

11:00 AM: Gov. McMaster and First Lady Peggy McMaster joined S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism (SCPRT) Director Duane Parrish, representatives from the PGA Tour and Congaree Golf Club for a press conference regarding the CJ Cup, Governor’s Mansion, 800 Richland Street, Columbia, S.C.

Thursday, October 13

10:00 AM: Gov. McMaster provided remarks at the Electric Vehicle Summit: Accelerating South Carolina’s e-Mobility Competitiveness, AC Hotel by Marriott Greenville,315 S Main Street, Greenville, S.C.

10:30 AM: Economic development meeting.

Noon: Gov. McMaster held a press conference at the Electric Vehicle Summit: Accelerating South Carolina’s e-Mobility Competitiveness, AC Hotel by Marriott Greenville, 315 S Main Street, Greenville, S.C.

1:00 PM: Gov. McMaster provided remarks at the National Governors Association Electric and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Infrastructure Summit, The AC Hotel, 315 S. Main Street, Greenville, S.C.

2:30 PM: Economic development meeting.

3:10 PM: Tourism meeting.

6:00 PM: Gov. McMaster and First Lady Peggy McMaster attended the National Governors Association’s Electric and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Summit Reception, Peace Center Conference Hall, 300 S. Main Street, Greenville, S.C.

Friday, October 14

Gov. McMaster was in the Office of the Governor for office hours, State House, 1100 Gervais Street, Columbia, S.C.

1:30 PM: Policy meeting.

2:00 PM: Media interview.

Owners of Hail Mary's and Salty Mary's Open Smokin’ Mary’s BBQ Pit and Saloon in N. Ridgeville

“I’m not going to lie – I’m never going to do two restaurants back-to-back like that again,” confesses Wil Novak.Novak and his wife and business partner Julie did not plan to open two restaurants within three months’ time, but delays with one restaurant forced the owners to do just that. In August, the Novaks opened Salty Mary's Oyster Bar (look for tomorrow's review) in Westlake. A couple months later they opened ...

“I’m not going to lie – I’m never going to do two restaurants back-to-back like that again,” confesses Wil Novak.

Novak and his wife and business partner Julie did not plan to open two restaurants within three months’ time, but delays with one restaurant forced the owners to do just that. In August, the Novaks opened Salty Mary's Oyster Bar (look for tomorrow's review) in Westlake. A couple months later they opened Smokin’ Mary’s BBQ Pit and Saloon a little farther down Center Ridge in North Ridgeville.

“We really like BBQ and N. Ridgeville doesn’t have much to choose from in that area,” Wil says. “We thought that clientele would like it.”

Novak describes Smokin’ Mary’s as a “Tex Mex-style” barbecue joint starring house-smoked brisket, pork shoulder and pork belly. The menu offers a great mix of Texas roadhouse hits like pimento dip and chips, fried pickle spears, steak chili, chicken-fried beef ribs and burnt ends. That smoked brisket, pork shoulder and pork belly lands atop nachos, inside tortillas, on buns as meaty sandwiches and by the pound with a choice of sauces like House Texas, Alabama White, Carolina, Bada Bing Cherry and Fire-Roasted Peach. On the side, there’s cowboy baked beans, Mexican street corn, mac and cheese and cornbread. For dessert, there’s Texas sheet cake and banana pudding.

Wil and Julie Novak each have worked in the hospitality industry for roughly 30 years. Wil worked alongside mega-restaurateur Cameron Mitchell in the early days, opening one concept after another. Five years ago, the couple decided to strike out on their own with Hail Mary’s, a popular tavern in Westlake.

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Relocation of Dorchester Heritage Center to Ridgeville slowly begins

RIDGEVILLE — The relocation of the Dorchester Heritage Center is slowly beginning, following a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the REV Pavilion.The Leadership Dorchester class, hosted by the Greater Summerville/Dorchester County Chamber of Commerce, helped by raising $60,000 to build the first structure of the new center: the REV Pavilion, which opened to the public Oct. 22. It was named for the REV Federal Credit Union, one of the sponsors for the project.The leadership class requires each year’s participants to do a p...

RIDGEVILLE — The relocation of the Dorchester Heritage Center is slowly beginning, following a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the REV Pavilion.

The Leadership Dorchester class, hosted by the Greater Summerville/Dorchester County Chamber of Commerce, helped by raising $60,000 to build the first structure of the new center: the REV Pavilion, which opened to the public Oct. 22. It was named for the REV Federal Credit Union, one of the sponsors for the project.

The leadership class requires each year’s participants to do a project that leaves a lasting impact on the county, said class member Rebecca Collett of Collett Media.

Collett said the class of 24 unanimously decided to help with the relocation and construction of the pavilion.

Justin Lee, a member of the class and executive director of operations at Gilbert & Lee Construction, said part of the reason the class chose the project was to feature nonprofits.

“We wanted to bridge the gap between western Dorchester County and the Greater Summerville area,” Lee said.

The leadership class had $7,000 left over from what it raised for the pavilion. It gave to the Heritage Center, which will honor the people in Dorchester County and help with historic grave preservation, Collett said.

“The center being located somewhat in the center of the county, I think it will gain lots of foot traffic since it’s in a very convenient place for everyone,” Lee said.

Lee anticipates breaking ground around March, and hopes to finish construction in the summer of 2024.

The Dorchester Heritage Center is a nonprofit that opened in 2014. Currently in the Dorchester County Courthouse in St. George, the center started small with just an archives genealogical library but grew to open a 4,000-square-foot museum in 2017.

Within 5½ weeks of the museum opening, over 3,000 people had visited. The center’s goal is to preserve the county’s history, said Phyllis Hughes, chairman of the Dorchester Heritage Center.

Over time, people began bringing in artifacts and all sorts of pictures, papers and rare books. After obtaining over 500,000 historical items, Hughes said they’ve outgrown the space, which led to a search for a new location.

They found and purchased an 81-acre site in Ridgeville, which is more convenient to the county as a whole and includes lots of space for new additions.

The new site will include a 20,000-square-foot center with indoor and outdoor event space, state-of-the-art archives, multipurpose conference rooms, a genealogy library, a museum and a green room, which will be used as a recording studio so “anyone can come in, sit down and tell their story.”

Outside of the heritage center, Hughes said there are other plans for the property. There will be walking trails, owl posts and birdhouses. The Boy Scouts will be involved with the wildlife aspect, with the opportunity to possibly monitor birdhouses on a monthly basis and earn merit badges, Hughes said.

“We want to become kind of a gateway to the county where people can come in and we can direct them to all the historic sites in our county,” Hughes said.

While waiting for the new facility to be built, the Dorchester Heritage Center will host classes throughout the county. On Nov. 17 at the community center in Ridgeville, it will kick off a new lecture series about the first Carolinians and will include the chiefs of the Edisto Natchez-Kusso and Wassamasaw Native American tribes as guest speakers.

Volvo to make flagship electric SUV in US and China

Volvo Cars launched its fully electric EX90 SUV last week. The seven-seater vehicle will be mass produced at the Swedish carmaker’s US plant in Ridgeville, South Carolina for domestic and export markets from 2024. Volvo said it also has plans to produce the vehicle in China.The EX90 is the first pure battery electric model in a range forthcoming over the next decade. Volvo plans to produce a new battery vehicle each year to 2030 by which time it aims to only sell EVs. By mid-decade the carmaker aims to sell 1.2m cars annually wi...

Volvo Cars launched its fully electric EX90 SUV last week. The seven-seater vehicle will be mass produced at the Swedish carmaker’s US plant in Ridgeville, South Carolina for domestic and export markets from 2024. Volvo said it also has plans to produce the vehicle in China.

The EX90 is the first pure battery electric model in a range forthcoming over the next decade. Volvo plans to produce a new battery vehicle each year to 2030 by which time it aims to only sell EVs. By mid-decade the carmaker aims to sell 1.2m cars annually with half of those fully electric cars. It also aims to sell half of all cars via online channels.

“The Volvo EX90 is not only our first-born electric SUV, it also marks the start of an intense renewal period during which we will launch one new fully electric car annually in coming years, powered by advanced technology and enhanced connectivity,” said Jim Rowan, chief executive, Volvo Cars.

The lithium-ion battery for the EX90 will be made by CATL, though the battery maker recently postponed plans to build a US plant. While not confirmed, it is likely that new US legislation on battery sourcing, outlined in the Inflation Reduction Act, will affect the cost of materials for the world’s largest battery maker.

The IRA promotes local production of both zero-emission vehicles and lithium batteries, and includes the domestic supply of battery materials, offering lots of provisions to source domestic materials and localise battery production from start to finish in the US.

Logistics advantages Volvo would not confirm any vehicle distribution plans at this stage but it is likely that for short and deep-sea exports the carmaker will use the port of Charleston, as it does for the S60, which is also made at the South Carolina plant. Production of the S60 began in 2018 and Volvo started exports to Europe through Charleston in 2019. More than half of the vehicles produced at the US plant are exported. The EX90s made in South Carolina will be delivered to markets in North and South America, and to Europe.

Logistics considerations, including international port access, were a factor in Volvo’s original choice of South Carolina to build its plant. The carmaker also pointed to the area’s well-trained workforce, good investment environment and experience in the hi-tech manufacturing sector.

South Carolina Ports announced last month that it was developing a rail link and intermodal yard to serve the Charleston port. Palmetto Railways will support Class I railroads CSX and Norfolk Southern in using the rail yard to move goods to and from the port. The port authority said around 24,000 metres of rail track will create a capacity of 1m rail lifts in Phase 1.

Rotary rails over I-26 expansion roundabouts

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.Wood, a construction service...

Local engineer Chris Wood’s presentation of SCDOT’s $179 million-plus structural undertaking comprising the widening of I-26 and new SC 27 Interchange was no mundane nuts-and-bolts rundown.

During his appearance at the Rotary Club of Summerville’s Nov. 2 meeting at the Nexton Hilton Garden Inn, organization members peppered the keynote speaker with doubts and concerns about two forthcoming roundabouts along the interchange site area near the Walmart Distribution Center in Ridgeville.

Wood, a construction services project manager for the HDR design firm of North Charleston, led off the PowerPoint overview by describing the multilayered roadwork as a “substantial” and “challenging” project aimed at expanding seven miles of the I-26 from mile marker 187 to mile marker 193. Further, the one-time Naval officer walked the audience through a summary of an interchange construction — in the form of a 192-foot bridge — at Ridgeville Road to promote better traffic flow.

The mere mention of the soon-to-be-built interchange set off a series of questions from multiple club members in attendance, with one Rotarian pointedly asking Wood to list the advantages— if any — of two roundabouts and/or traffic signal/signage alternatives near the Walmart storage facility.

The civil engineer offered that the tight circular roundabout structures serve the purpose of adding a constant flow of traffic that — he estimated — works well with mid-level conditions of highway car travel.

“In other words, this isn’t high volume yet, so it keeps traffic moving under mid-level volumes of traffic,” detailed Wood, who reminded listeners that he is neither the design engineer nor a DOT authority who selected the roundabout method.

A fellow PE in the room questioned the functionality and purpose of roundabouts and the difficulties that they would present to regular drivers in light of the preponderance of large trucks that would traversing the make-shift, circular junction.

Wood explained that the roundabouts would be large enough to handle trucks coming from the Walmart site. He also mentioned how the curving of the circling structures would allow the trucks to navigate the roundabouts, while pointing out that the surrounding concrete would be sturdy enough to withstand the weight of the large vehicles.

Roundabouts are nothing new and have, in fact, been in existence for over 100 years, according to reports. However, their usage hasn’t always garnered public support due to instances where cars entering the traffic circle wind up frequently having the right-of-way over cars that are already in that same circle.

Other traditional cons concerning the viability of roundabouts stem from driver uncertainty about yielding, the overabundance of merge points, driver speed, motorists who try to cut the roundabout and cyclist/pedestrian shoulder lanes that are sometimes deemed as too narrow, potentially endangering those parties.

Wood’s description of the work continued with his narration of project elements regarding the construction of the S-32 Cypress Campground Road Bridge and the new I-26 bridge over Cypress Swamp.

The most formidable challenge of the DOT venture, he observed, is the installation of six box culverts (i.e. structural drainage that spans from one side of the road to the other).

“They’re substantial in size. You’re talking about this one here is a 287-foot, triple-barrel, 10′ x 9′ box culvert across the highway, so I mean, I hope it would be adequate to prevent situations like what you’re talking about,” said Wood in response to a Rotarian’s recollection of the addition of the 1-26 negatively impacting and/or impeding the backflow of area waterways.

“I would think that the new systems would be larger than the existing [ones] to handle these larger rain events. You make me want to check that when I go back, but rarely do you ever go smaller for a box culvert or any drainage component,” replied Wood.

In closing, the presenter maintained that the DOT is doing a fine job of planning ahead in reference to three future bill packages impacting the I-26, U.S. Highway 176 and South Carolina Highway 187.

Other details communicated by Wood pertaining the 1-26 widening and new interchange/bridge construction included a Nov. 30, 2026 contract completion date, as Banks Construction of North Charleston has been hired to handle the labor-and-materials aspect of the project.

“In summary, I’d just like to say that the I-26, mile marker 187 is a major component to the South Carolina transportation planning, which supports the local growth by improving the essential freight corridor essentially out of Charleston with all the port activities and with Walmart, Volvo and other companies moving in,” concluded the married father of three, who has previously managed over $200 million of construction in the Lowcountry.

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