Fencing Companyin Sullivan's Island, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in Sullivan's Island. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in Sullivan's Island, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Sullivan’s Island celebrates Carolina Day 2022

Residents and island visitors gathered on a clear Saturday at the steps of Town Hall Plaza on Sullivan’s Island to commemorate the 246th anniversary of the Battle of Sullivan’s Island, an annual event hosted by Battery Gadsden Cultural Center.On June 28, 1776, Sgt. William Jasper and others from the Second South Carolina Regiment, which was commanded by Col. William Moultrie, hoisted a regimental flag upon a partially completed palmetto ...

Residents and island visitors gathered on a clear Saturday at the steps of Town Hall Plaza on Sullivan’s Island to commemorate the 246th anniversary of the Battle of Sullivan’s Island, an annual event hosted by Battery Gadsden Cultural Center.

On June 28, 1776, Sgt. William Jasper and others from the Second South Carolina Regiment, which was commanded by Col. William Moultrie, hoisted a regimental flag upon a partially completed palmetto log fort to defend colonial Charleston against a major land and sea assault led by British Admiral Sir Peter Parker and Gen. Henry Clinton.

On Saturday, emcee Chuck Galis welcomed the gathering crowd to a Carolina Day celebration. Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil read a proclamation to kick off the ceremony. Members of Boy Scout Troop 59, which meets regularly at Stella Maris Church on the island, led a presentation and raising of the bright blue Moultrie Flag, followed by a dramatic musket salute by members of the modern-day Second South Carolina Regiment.

Maggie Adams, regent for St. Sullivan Chapter-NSDAR, recalled the life, death and courageous example of Col. Michael Kovats, a Hungarian cavalryman who trained and led the Continental Army during the British siege of Charleston. In January 1777, Kovats penned a letter to then-American Ambassador in France, Benjamin Franklin, in which he pledged his sword to defend the Continental Army’s cause. He famously closed the letter with the salutation, “Most faithful unto death.” Kovats ultimately gave his life in the American War for Independence on May 11, 1779. (Wikipedia reports, “To this date, Michael de Kovats is celebrated by cadets at The Citadel Military College in Charleston, South Carolina, where part of the campus is named in his honor. The Hungarian Embassy in Washington, D.C., has a statue sculpted by Paul Takacs and executed by Attila Dienes.”)

Mike Walsh, president of the Battery Gadsden Cultural Center, closed the ceremony by conveying the 2022 Cultural Stewardship Award to former Sullivan’s Island resident Wayne Stelljes. The Rev. Dr. Daniel W. Massie offered a benediction.

Rob Byko is a local Realtor and avid photographer. All photos in this story are by Rob Byko Photography and are copyrighted. All rights reserved.

Town leaders, advocates say cutting of Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest likely illegal

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town official...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.

Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town officials say they are investigating to determine if the cutting was illegal.

“We were heartbroken and devastated to see the extent of the cutting,” says Karen Byko, President of SI4ALL.

The clearing has town leaders and residents including Byko scrambling to stop the chop of the island’s accreted forest the say provides protection from storms and flooding while offering a home for native wildlife.

“Concern is that we are devastating the very thing that is protecting us and it provides a home to our wildlife partners,” says Byko.

A majority of the cutting happened behind a house near Station 26 on Atlantic Avenue. Zillow records show the house was listed for sale on February 10th, around the time the cutting was believed to have happened, for $2.9 million. The house was then taken off the market five days later on February 15th after concerns over the cutting were raised at a town council meeting.

News 2 went to the home in front of the cutting to ask the owners if they knew anything about the cutting, a housekeeper was the only person home at the time and declined to answer questions.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says they haven’t received any tree cutting permits from either the Town of Sullivan’s Island or private residents. The agency says they recommended more discussion at the local level late last year before permitting any clearing of vegetation.

Town councilmembers Gary Visser and Scott Millimet called the cutting illegal and disheartening to see.

“The disregard for our community that they are a part of,” says Visser. Millimet called the act “extremely selfish.”

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’neil says the town is conducting a serious and thorough investigation into the cutting to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. Town officials are hopeful stricter penalties for cutting trees will be adopted by Town Council moving forward.

“If somebody says you’re going to have to wear an orange jumpsuit for 30 days, that might be a bigger deterrent,” says Millimet.

“We hope that they will prosecute to the fullest extent of the law,” says Byko.

The Army Corps of Engineers says they have not been contacted to investigate the cutting. Town officials say they will continue to investigate the incident.

Sullivan’s Island restaurant opens with fresh fish, ’1970s-inspired’ beachside aesthetic

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood an...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood and beach-themed cocktails Tuesday through Sunday.

The Towills are the owners of design and hospitality firm Basic Projects. Kate, head of design for the Charleston-based company, has led the design of residential and commercial properties, including an athletic club and Basic Projects’ two other restaurants: Basic Kitchen and Post House.

Alongside her husband, Basic Projects head of operations Eva Suarez and other members of the team, Kate led the two-year renovation of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, where she set out to create a 1970s-inspired beachside aesthetic. Her goal was to give the space a fresh look with elements honoring Sullivan’s Seafood, like a framed flag and original menu.

A place that feels new and nostalgic all at once.

“That’s been the biggest compliment that we have received is (people saying) ‘Oh it feels like it’s been here forever,’ ” Kate Towill said.

Leading the kitchen as executive chef is Davis Hood, who grew up on Isle of Palms with his brother Nathan, culinary director of Basic Projects. Hood, who recalls walking by the Middle Street building on his way to Sullivan’s Island Elementary School, is focusing on sustainability at the new Sullivan’s Island restaurant.

Local purveyors like Abundant Seafood, Tarvin Seafood, Lowcountry Oyster Co., Vertical Roots and Peculiar Pig Farm dot the Sullivan’s Fish Camp menu.

“It’s not your average fish camp in my eyes,” Hood said. “The whole concept of snout to tail cooking, we’re trying to bring that vibe but with fish. Understanding that the ocean is such an important part of our lives and not trying to have any waste.”

If there is one dish that epitomizes this approach, it’s the Sullivan’s Island Gumbo that features Tarvin Seafood shrimp, clams, okra, lobster broth, dayboat fish and Anson Mills Charleston Gold Rice. The West African style gumbo’s gluten-free base is made using chicken bones, lobster shells, shrimp shells, fennel, celery, palm oil and Bradford Family Farm okra, which replaces a roux as the stew’s thickening agent.

Ben Towill said the gumbo, along with the pan-roasted fish of the day and tempura nori tuna with furikake aioli have been some of the restaurant’s top sellers in its first weeks of service.

“We feel like the menu’s been received really well,” Ben Towill said. “Guests and everyone have felt really comfortable which has been a big bonus.”

Fresh seafood isn’t the only element that gives Sullivan’s Fish Camp that desired beachside feel. Self-described “fruity” cocktails like the tequila-based Sumter’s Watch, rum-based Sullivan Swizzle and the frozen paloma will immediately put patrons on island time.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is open for dinner from 5-10 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and lunch is currently served from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. The restaurant plans to eventually serve lunch and dinner daily.

For more information, visit sullivansfishcamp.com or call 843-883-2100.

Sullivan’s Island restaurant’s retention rate stands out amid staffing crisis

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Obstinate Daughter bar manager Frank Arevalo has always been a fan of celebrating career milestones.Since joining the island standby eight years ago, he has helped make this ethos a part of everyday life for the restaurant’s employees.When a member of Obstinate Daughter’s team celebrates a one-, two- or six-year anniversary, Arevalo honors their achievement on social media.There have b...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Obstinate Daughter bar manager Frank Arevalo has always been a fan of celebrating career milestones.

Since joining the island standby eight years ago, he has helped make this ethos a part of everyday life for the restaurant’s employees.

When a member of Obstinate Daughter’s team celebrates a one-, two- or six-year anniversary, Arevalo honors their achievement on social media.

There have been a lot of posts in the last year.

Dylan Elliott (two years), Samuel Elvington (three years), Shaun Jefferson (two years), Zoe Alessandra De Luca-Parker (two years), Andrea Deslauriers (three years) and Whitney Reed Mallett (five years) have all celebrated work anniversaries in the past seven months. Many more have already surpassed one year at Obstinate Daughter.

Arevalo started the tradition years ago when a server named Tifyane Tipton was nearing her five-year anniversary. The 29-year food and beverage industry veteran posted about Tipton’s milestone on social media. The rest is history.

“Before we started posting them on Instagram, we would have a calendar with milestones and birthdays posted up in the restaurant as a reminder of those special occasions,” Arevalo said. “Our No. 1 asset is our people. Celebrating milestones creates a culture of being valued.”

This culture starts at the top with owner Doug Godley, who provides employees with paid vacation and match a portion of their 401(k), among other benefits. Both Godley and Obstinate Daughter executive chef Jacques Larson say they hope to create the best possible work environment for all employees.

“Chefs and anyone in the industry, it’s expected that you work at least six days for at least 12 hours long. No other industry demands that you put in those kinds of hours,” Larson said. “People that do that don’t have employees holding signs.”

In May, bartender Lauren Drees will hold up a sign that reads “five years,” an anniversary she credits to the restaurant’s customers, commitment to the environment and her coworkers. The Pittsburgh native said she plans to stay put at Obstinate Daughter for a long time.

“There’s a really good rapport between front of the house and back of the house,” Drees said. “It just makes everything smoother when you feel like you can ask questions.”

Obstinate Daughter chef de cuisine Will D’Erasmo bought into the company culture after first meeting Godley and Larson at Wild Olive, their Johns Island restaurant that opened in 2009. There, D’Erasmo worked as a line cook for two years before joining Obstinate Daughter when it opened in 2014.

“At this point it’s kind of like my home because I’ve put so much time and energy into it. Doug is an extremely generous boss. He provides us with new equipment if we ask for it and things like that,” D’Erasmo said. “I enjoy the food and I like working with Jacques.”

Employment in South Carolina’s leisure and hospitality sector grew 2.2 percent from March to April, but Charleston area restaurateurs are still struggling with a staffing crisis that existed even before the COVID-19 pandemic. While Obstinate Daughter has a stable staff, there are days when the kitchen crew is short a member or two.

During those shifts, everyone chips in.

“The sheer volume that we’re doing, we’re blowing through food products,” D’Erasmo said. “It gets stressful and how to alleviate some of that stress is something we’re always thinking about.”

D’Erasmo motivates the back of the house by allowing chefs to move around the kitchen. “Tough love” was the norm early on in his career, but nowadays, he prefers a different mantra: A compliment can go a long way.

The opportunity to learn and earn more responsibilities in the kitchen has benefited executive sous chef Carlos Paredes, who joined Obstinate Daughter six years ago. On most nights, Paredes is in charge of coming up with the restaurant’s daily specials.

“The restaurant works completely different. If you’re working the line, you have to have a different set of skills,” Paredes said. “Nobody’s bored doing one station every time.”

Obstinate Daughter is a high-volume operation, so chefs who tire of the nighttime hours can join the morning prep team. The restaurant has been the ultimate training ground for Paredes, who is nearing the end of his tenure at Obstinate Daughter as he plans for the opening of his own restaurant in his home country of Peru.

Opening a restaurant has always been Paredes’ dream, but he was tempted by the thought of staying at Obstinate Daughter for as long as D’Erasmo and Larson would have him. As it stands, the chef will stay until the new restaurant is closer to its opening date.

“I think it’s definitely going to crush me,” Paredes said of leaving Obstinate Daughter. “I fell in love with the place. It actually make me find what I really want to be doing.”

Obstinate Daughter, located at 2063 Middle St., is open daily for lunch and dinner. For more information, visit theobstinatedaughter.com.

First Look: Sullivan’s Fish Camp

This spring, an old South Carolina beachside haunt finds new lifeWhen Ben and Kate Towill—the couple that owns the design and hospitality firm Basic Projects, Charleston’s Basic Kitchen, and Mount Pleasant’s Post House Inn—had the opportunity to reopen the doors of Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant, they jumped at the chance. The original restaurant, founded in 1988 by Sammy and D...

This spring, an old South Carolina beachside haunt finds new life

When Ben and Kate Towill—the couple that owns the design and hospitality firm Basic Projects, Charleston’s Basic Kitchen, and Mount Pleasant’s Post House Inn—had the opportunity to reopen the doors of Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant, they jumped at the chance. The original restaurant, founded in 1988 by Sammy and Donna Rhodes, opened right before Hurricane Hugo hit the South Carolina coast. After the Rhodes rebuilt the nearly destroyed building, it became a family-run institution on Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina, beloved by both locals and visitors for more than three decades.

When the Rhodes planned to retire and close the doors to Sullivan’s in 2021, Basic Projects offered to revive the space on Middle Street and honor its history, renaming the spot Sullivan’s Fish Camp. For nearly two years, the team has been revamping the space for its new chapter starting May 17, 2022—while keeping preservation in mind. The team kept the “sailor’s den” feel, restoring the original wood bar and paneling. They added dark-stained lacquered wood booths, tables, and chairs. During renovations, they replaced the water-damaged floor, but the new yellow-and-white checkered linoleum floors keep a vintage look. “The wood and floor are treated for coastal weather, and they only get better with age,” Kate says.

“From the menu to the old pictures, we wanted to keep the same energy that everyone had loved about Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant,” says Kate, who spearheaded the restaurant’s renovation and spent months collecting both contemporary custom-made artwork and antique decor. Above the entrance, a vintage photo of the first restaurant hangs by an original menu with sprawling staff signatures. The front check-in desk remains in the same cozy nook with a walk-up window, and soft serve ice cream machines. Illustrations of scalloped seashells, which had first appeared on the border of the 1988 menu, frame the new custom blue-and-white dishware. A giant blue longbill, with a brass nameplate reading Bob Marlin, is accompanied by an imaginative story of its capture by Captain Sullivan after Hurricane Hugo. “We like to imagine characters that would have visited the old restaurant,” Kate says. “We aren’t afraid to have some fun.”

The drinks play up the humor too, including tropical sippers with names like the Banana Hammock and Pool Boy. Dishes include a swordfish BLT, fresh-caught crudo, shrimp fried with truffle and parmesan, and, Kate’s favorite, a hot brown butter lobster roll.

The restaurant’s interior also brings in work from painters, photographers, printmakers, and glassmakers, fusing together retro nostalgia with contemporary art from the Lowcountry. “It was important to have a strong sense of place,” Ben says. “We wanted the decor to ooze Sullivan’s Island without being gimmicky. Having local artists added those specific, authentic details.” North Charleston’s Charlestowne Stained Glass Studio created custom stained glass lamps emblazoned with Sullivan’s Fish Camp. The paneled bathroom sports a gallery wall of Southeastern saltwater fish painted by the North Carolina marine biologist and illustrator Duane Raver. There’s even more outside: Above the patio, you can spot the work of Mickey Williams, a famed painter and Sullivan’s Island local, who created two large-scale landscapes for each side of a pub sign.

While Sullivan’s Fish Camp pays homage to the original seafood restaurant, it also looks forward to the future, bringing modernity to the space with a refreshing spin on the idea of a traditional fish camp. “Everything can’t be what’s expected,” Ben says. “Instead of looking back and trying to copy the past, we’re reimagining what a fish camp can be in 2022.”

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