Fencing Companyin West Ashley, SC

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Privacy Fences: A great privacy fence not only protects your family from the prying eyes of strangers. It can be great for security, too. Available in a variety of materials like vinyl and wood, privacy fences transform spaces like backyards into secluded hideaways. Ask Five Star Fence about decorative options, too, like post caps, coordinating gates, and lattice panel tops.

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Picket Fences: If you want to capture the essence of Americana, a picket fence might be your best choice. One of the most beloved styles of all time, many picket fences come with heavy-duty vinyl and feature extra-wide posts with slimmer top and bottom rails. You can also choose from several stylish wooden picket fences to enhance your home's appearance.

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Chain Link Fences: Chain link fencing is one of the most common, cost-effective ways to keep your property safe. Available in galvanized and aluminized options, you can also select vinyl coated colors like black and green. For extra security, Five Star Fence Company can install barbed wire and even automatic gates if needed.

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Aluminum Fences: Often considered the ultimate combo of beauty, durability, and strength, aluminum fencing enhances your home's curb appeal and protects too. Warranted by the manufacturer for life, aluminum fences at Five Star Fence Company come in many colors and styles. We even have a variety of heights to pick from as well, including special order aluminum fences.

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Wooden Fences: From heavy-duty lattice fences made with pressure-washed pine to traditional estate-style split-rail fencing, wooden fences are affordable and effective. But wood fences do more than fill a need - they add value and style to your home. Fenced-in yards are a hot commodity in today's real estate market and can boost the value of your home if you're looking to sell. In terms of ROI, wood fencing is near the top of the list. At Five Star Fence Company, our design team will work closely with you to install the wooden fence of your dreams.

Frequently Asked Fencing Questions

At Five Star Fence, we do everything in our power to make your fence installation easy, streamlined, and effortless on your end. If you're considering a new fence installation, you probably have some questions about our process. To help address some of your concerns, here are answers to some of the most common questions that come across our desks.

Q. I need a fence installed for my home in West Ashley. How long will it take?

A. A typical residential fence takes between two to four days to complete, depending on the size and build of your home. We will do our best to cater to your busy schedule and offer reliable fence installation services Monday-Friday. Should you have specific needs on the day of your fence installation, please let our staff know so that we can do our best to work with you.

Q. Another company told me that they don't use cement to secure posts in the ground. Is that true?

A. Absolutely not. Do not let anyone tell you that you do not need your posts cemented in the ground. At Five Star Fence, every post we plant is cemented into the ground, no questions asked. Depending on the type of fence that we're installing for you, your posts will be about 24-48 inches in the ground to ensure stability and durability.

Quality Workmanship. Unmatched Fence
Installation in West Ashley, SC

Whether you need a new, beautiful wood fence to enhance curb appeal or an aluminum fence to help secure your residential property, Five Star Fence Company is here to help. After 28 years in the business, we have the knowledge and the experience to get the job done right. We pledge to provide you with honest work and the best fencing services in the Lowcountry. Contact our office today to get started on your free quote. Before you know it, your property will be a safer, more enjoyable place to spend time all year long.

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Latest News in West Ashley, SC

Charleston County Parks accepting bids for planned 67-acre park in West Ashley

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County parks is looking to spend millions of dollars on a new park in West Ashley near Charles Towne Landing.Behind a gate off Old Towne Road sits 67 acres of land called Old Towne Creek County Park, the majority of which is protected for conservation. The county wants to add features to the land and open it up for the public to use.“As you look around, you see different pockets of where the sun is shining through, and people will be able to peer into different spaces and different win...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Charleston County parks is looking to spend millions of dollars on a new park in West Ashley near Charles Towne Landing.

Behind a gate off Old Towne Road sits 67 acres of land called Old Towne Creek County Park, the majority of which is protected for conservation. The county wants to add features to the land and open it up for the public to use.

“As you look around, you see different pockets of where the sun is shining through, and people will be able to peer into different spaces and different windows into the landscape,” Charleston County Parks Senior Planner Matt Moldenhauer said. “Obviously, we’re on a peninsula surrounded by Old Towne Creek, which is spectacular, and so people really get to appreciate all we have here.”

The county is accepting construction bids for the planned park. Moldenhauer said they want to add a one mile, Americans with Disabilities Act-accessible walking trail, build a park center with restrooms and a pavilion as well as create separate entrances for vehicles and pedestrians.

There are three historic structures on the property. The county plans to fix up the outside of two homes built in the 1910s, but people will not be able to go inside.

“That [conservation] easement not only protects the landscape of most of the property but also two of the structures, which were built in the early 1900s,” Moldenhauer said.

Officials also hope to add a playground and an elevated overlook of the creek, but it depends on the bids they get back from contractors.

Moldenhauer said the park has been in the works since the county bought the property just over 10 years ago. The property had been privately owned up until then.

Neighbors said they are excited about it potentially opening, since the site is only open for certain events, such as Wine Down Wednesdays, which will be cancelled until renovations are complete.

“We have to keep our eyes open where it’s available for us to go,” neighbor Noel Beatty said. “We’ll frequent it more if it’s made more available to the general public.”

Moldenhauer said these improvements are part of phase one of the park. There is no timetable for a second phase at this time.

Officials hope to start construction early next year and have it open to the public in 2025.

“We hope that when they come out here, we’ve really done our best to take a very light touch on this already immaculate landscape,” Moldenhauer said.

The county will be holding a meeting Wednesday at 10 a.m. for contractors to visit the site and come up with quotes for potential bids.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Wren’s Ashley Stein is voted SBLive South Carolina Athlete of the Week

Congratulations to Wren's Ashley Stein, the winner of SBLive South Carolina's Athlete of Week award as voted by South Carolina high school sports fans.Stein, a 6-foot-1 junior outside hitter, smacked 16 kills in the AAA Upper State finals against Powdersville. Wren won 3-1 and then went on to win the state championship.If you would like to nominate an athlete, please email athleteoftheweek@scorebooklive.com or message us on Twitter or Instagram at @sblivesc.Here are all the other athletes that were nominated for Oct. 31-...

Congratulations to Wren's Ashley Stein, the winner of SBLive South Carolina's Athlete of Week award as voted by South Carolina high school sports fans.

Stein, a 6-foot-1 junior outside hitter, smacked 16 kills in the AAA Upper State finals against Powdersville. Wren won 3-1 and then went on to win the state championship.

If you would like to nominate an athlete, please email athleteoftheweek@scorebooklive.com or message us on Twitter or Instagram at @sblivesc.

Here are all the other athletes that were nominated for Oct. 31-Nov. 5:

Chas Smith, Gaffney, Football

A freshman running back, Smith had 152 yards and a pair of touchdowns on 17 carries. He also caught 2 passes for 37 yards. That's making an impact early in a player’s career.

Bri Mahoney, Aiken, Volleyball

The Wofford-bound outside hitter had 22 kills and 17 digs in a 3-1 victory over rival South Aiken in the Upper State finals. She then helped lead the Green Hornets to a 3-2 win over North Myrtle Beach for the AAAA state championship.

Aliam Appler, Dutch Fork, Football

The Silver Foxes’ senior quarterback threw for 193 yards, ran for 61 and accounted for 4 touchdowns.

Scott Saylor, Carolina Forest, Football

Saylor threw for five touchdowns and set the school record for passing yardage in a season as the Spartans overcame River Bluff 42-28. The senior quarterback was 12 of 19 for 268 yards without a turnover.

Drew Arant, Saluda, Football

It doesn't get much sharper than this. Arant was 12-of-14 for 204 yards and 5 touchdowns - all in the first half - as Saluda easily dispatched of Liberty in the AA playoffs.

Darren Floyd, West Florence, Football

This was a huge performance. Floyd erupted for 360 yards and 5 touchdowns on 27 carries as fourth-ranked West Florence pulled away from Lugoff-Elgin 52-27. He scored on runs of 41, 26, 37, 39 and 75 yards.

Jarvis Green, Dutch Fork, Football

Green seemingly does this every week. The James Madison recruit had 152 yards and a pair of touchdowns rushing. He caught 5 passes for 102 yards and a touchdown as Dutch Fork improved to 10-1.

Demarius Foster, Dorman, Football

The star tailback ran 25 times for 274 yards and a touchdown in Dorman’s 37-7 win over Clover. He also caught 2 passes for 62 yards and a touchdown.

Tyler Smith, Barnwell, Football

Smith had a huge night for the undefeated Warhorses, running 22 times for 343 yards and 6 touchdowns. He’s been doing this all season.

SC starts 12 days of early voting on Monday. What you need to know.

Two weeks of no-excuse-needed early voting kicks off Oct. 24 at more than 100 locations statewide, giving South Carolinians more options than ever for casting a ballot with hopefully little to no wait.It’s South Carolina’s first general election under a Statehouse law signed by Gov. Henry McMaster in May which directed each county to open up to seven early voting sites for 12 days through the Saturday before Election Day.All locations must open to voters from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. in all 46 counties from the coast to ...

Two weeks of no-excuse-needed early voting kicks off Oct. 24 at more than 100 locations statewide, giving South Carolinians more options than ever for casting a ballot with hopefully little to no wait.

It’s South Carolina’s first general election under a Statehouse law signed by Gov. Henry McMaster in May which directed each county to open up to seven early voting sites for 12 days through the Saturday before Election Day.

All locations must open to voters from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. in all 46 counties from the coast to the mountains.

The exception is Oct. 30, as the law forbids Sunday voting.

Early voters can choose whatever site is most convenient for them within the county where they’re registered, whether that’s close to home, work or shopping. They aren’t limited by their home address.

“Early voting is a big deal for South Carolina,” state Election Commission spokesman Chris Whitmire said. “It gives a lot more access, more options for busy people to go vote. That’s the biggest benefit.”

It also should reduce stress on poll workers and give them more time to fix problems as they arise, which in turn also benefits voters, he said.

“Whatever line you’ve had before will be better,” Whitmire said.

The 111 early voting sites statewide represent a 35 percent increase from the total that opened before the June primaries, when election officers had less than three weeks to put the new rules into practice.

Nineteen of South Carolina’s rural counties are still offering a single location, usually at their main election office.

Some of the most-populous counties are providing several additional options. For example, Lexington went from one to five. Charleston County, which also offered a single site in June, is among three counties opening the maximum seven.

Greenville and Horry counties are the other two with seven.

Voting sites for every county can be found on the S.C. Election Commission website at scvotes.gov/voters/early-voting. By law, each county election office must also post local locations on its own website.

Voting absentee by mail is also underway. Those who qualify include people who are 65 and older, have physical disabilities, or work a job that doesn’t allow them to vote in person during the two-week early voting window. Applications must be in by Oct. 28. People returning a mailed ballot in person must show identification.

Charleston County, which has opened satellite offices since 2016 under prior law that required an excuse for voting early, has planned since January to open seven once the legislation passed. But when the final version didn’t allow for mobile sites as intended, the county reverted to one, but only for the primaries, said Isaac Cramer, director of the Charleston County Board of Elections.

Local sites for this election include four libraries and two churches spread out from Hollywood to Mount Pleasant, with the largest site being the North Charleston Convention Center. That was a popular spot for voters in November 2020, Cramer said.

Amid the pandemic, legislators passed a temporary law allowing no-excuse-needed in-person absentee voting for that election only. One problem was that access varied widely across the state. Even so, it marked the first time that more South Carolinians voted early than on Election Day.

Two years later under the new law requiring options with standardized hours, Charleston County has added sites on James Island, Johns Island and Hollywood.

“We wanted to expand to areas with population growth and rural areas so people across the county would have shorter distances to travel,” Cramer said.

The more than 150 additional workers hired specifically for early voting began weeklong training sessions Oct. 17. They’re prepared for busy, 12-hour days. They’ll stay on through Election Day at $15 an hour, which becomes $22.50 hourly for required overtime, he said.

In the Upstate, Greenville and Spartanburg counties each hired dozens of additional poll workers for early voting.

Staffing concerns are partly why Spartanburg went with three offerings for its first election with multiple sites, said its elections director, Adam Hammons.

Since turnout is generally lower for midterm elections than in presidential contests, “starting with three early voting centers that are fully staffed and ready for voters was our decision,” he said.

It’s among 10 counties opening three locations.

Others include nearby Pickens County, Dorchester County in the Lowcountry, and York County south of Charlotte, as well as rural Barnwell and Hampton counties along the Georgia line.

Georgetown and Beaufort counties are each operating four sites.

Georgetown officials didn’t see a reason to open the max, said elections director Aphra McCrea.

There was an obvious need for a location in the Waccamaw Neck, a peninsula east of the Waccamaw River that is where most voters live. The county office made sense as it’s already equipped to handle early voting. The other two were put in locations convenient for rural residents, McCrea said.

Lexington and Richland are the only counties offering five locations.

Richland County has had more shakeups at its long-troubled election agency in the last few months, to include the resignation of its director. But interim director Terry Graham, who also submitted a resignation letter before agreeing to stay through the elections, insisted the county is prepared for the election and early voting.

County officials considered expanding to six but decided it lacked sufficient workers and money for an additional site, he said.

“Money always is a deciding factor. If we could do more, we would do more,” he said. “We didn’t want to spread ourselves too thin by adding more people and more locations.”

Spencer Donovan contributed from Greenville. Leah Hincks contributed from Columbia. Mike Woodel contributed from Georgetown. Nicole Ziege contributed from Myrtle Beach.

West Ashley neighbors concerned about flooding almost entering their homes

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCSC) - Neighbors in a West Ashley community say they are frustrated and anxious after floodwater crept up to their homes, and a potential solution could be a few years away.Bennett Barton and Rachel Brunette said Thursday’s rainstorms flooded both the road and their backyards, almost getting into their houses. They said as cars passed by, the wake would go up and slap against their front doors.“This is my first house; I didn’t know what to expect,” Barton said. “I started panick...

WEST ASHLEY, S.C. (WCSC) - Neighbors in a West Ashley community say they are frustrated and anxious after floodwater crept up to their homes, and a potential solution could be a few years away.

Bennett Barton and Rachel Brunette said Thursday’s rainstorms flooded both the road and their backyards, almost getting into their houses. They said as cars passed by, the wake would go up and slap against their front doors.

“This is my first house; I didn’t know what to expect,” Barton said. “I started panicking. I couldn’t leave to get sandbags or any preventative measures because the road was flooded, too.”

They said as cars passed by, the wake would go up and slap against their front doors.

“At one point, I even got pitchers and just was pouring them into my sink from my screened-in porch,” Barton said. Didn’t do anything, but it made me ease my mind a little bit.”

The Woodlands neighborhood is part of the Dupont Wappoo Watershed, which consists of around 1,000 acres of West Ashley surrounding the Citadel Mall.

The City of Charleston said they are spending $5 million on four out of the 10 scheduled projects to improve downstream water flow under Interstate 526. Once that is done, the city will be increasing the size of pipes and canals near the Woodlands neighborhood to get the water out faster.

“There’s not a lot of elevation change to make that water flow very quickly,” Charleston Director of Stormwater Management Matthew Fountain said, “so those very small ditches don’t work for how much pavement, how many buildings we have in the basin now.”

Brunette said it is not uncommon for her to have to check the weather radar before she leaves for work.

“So, when I’m away for the day, I have to be prepared that whether my windows are open, whether the dog is in or out, and like you said if the vehicle is in the right place in case it does flood,” Brunette said. “There’s been a couple of cars that have been flooded out. The landscaping, you can’t keep decent landscaping. It washes away.”

The city said they are optimistic construction on the projects will start in 2025, but until then, Barton said his anxiety will continue.

“If it had rained for two more hours or it was going into high tide, I think my living room would have been underwater,” Barton said. “Who knows how much that would have cost?”

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Cobras out to defend region crown

Last season, the Cane Bay High School boys basketball team was part of a special winter on campus.The Cobras and also the girls basketball team won their first-ever region championships on the hardwood. Cane Bay students routinely packed sections of stands home and away to take it all in. Adding to the frenzy, the Cobras’ wrestling team won a region title.“Our goal is to pick up where we left off,” Cane Bay boys basketball coach Shawn McKeen said. “We’ve got six seniors coming up. These guys have p...

Last season, the Cane Bay High School boys basketball team was part of a special winter on campus.

The Cobras and also the girls basketball team won their first-ever region championships on the hardwood. Cane Bay students routinely packed sections of stands home and away to take it all in. Adding to the frenzy, the Cobras’ wrestling team won a region title.

“Our goal is to pick up where we left off,” Cane Bay boys basketball coach Shawn McKeen said. “We’ve got six seniors coming up. These guys have played for a while so I expect them to lead.”

The Cobras finished 21-7 and ended the 2021-22 campaign in the second round of the Class AAAAA playoffs. McKeen garnered region coach of the year honors and three seniors earned all-region nods.

“We plan to keep the intensity going with the student section so we can feed off that,” McKeen said. “That definitely helps when you have a whole school behind you.”

As for returning players, Cane Bay was hit hard by graduation. Five of the top six scorers moved on, with only senior guard Jordyn McKeen coming back. McKeen (5-10) averaged 9.9 points per game and was an all-region player as a sophomore. Junior guard CJ Dixon (6-2), senior center Jayden Diaz (6-5) and senior forward Tyler Giles (6-1) are also returning lettermen. Dixon and Giles scored better than three points per game in 2021-22.

At least two transfers figure to bolster the starting lineup this winter. Senior guards Chauncey Capers (5-9) and Zilas Johnson (5-10) were consistent performers at their former schools. Capers scored 4.2 points and dished 1.4 assists per game for Fort Dorchester as the Patriots advanced to the state final in 2012-22 while Johnson averaged 5.8 points, 1.7 assists and 1.5 steals for Woodland. The Wolverines won 17 games.

Junior forward Isaac Smalls (6-3), junior forward Ziayre Williams (6-7) and senior Colby Hill (6-6) are expected to contribute to the effort around the basket.

The Cobras enter the season ranked No. 10 in Class AAAAA by the South Carolina Basketball Coaches Association. They’re more the hunted than the hunter they were last season. Coach McKeen welcomes the pressure.

“To me it’s motivation to keep going.,” he said. “One year isn’t enough. Just because we’ve won it, it doesn’t mean anything is just going to be given to you. Everything is going to have to be earned. It’s going to be hard work. We’ve built a really competitive non-region schedule because we know region is going to be tough.”

Region rival Goose Creek is ranked No. 3 in Class AAAAA to start the season. Berkeley and Wando have new coaches, and Stratford has also picked up a key transfer. McKeen expects night in and night out to be a battle when the Region 6-AAAAA slate tips off in January. The Cobras went 7-1 in the region last year.

“Hopefully we can get ready for region in our non-region games,” McKeen said. “I know Goose Creek is dynamic. Everybody looks better. It’s going to be tough. It’s not going to be easy but we’re just going to keep working.”

Cane Bay opens Nov. 28 at Andrews and hosts Timberland Nov. 30, Carolina Forest Dec. 2 and Andrews Dec. 5.

The Cobras then travel for three straight: West Ashley (Dec. 7), James Island (Dec. 9) and Summerville (Dec. 12). Cane Bay has five more December games before the calendar turns to 2023 and the second half of the campaign.

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